Entertainment

Harsh story given dose of humanity

Rachel Mwanza plays a 14-year-old Congolese girl named Komona, who is kidnapped and made a child soldier in Rebelle.  - TIFF.net
Rachel Mwanza plays a 14-year-old Congolese girl named Komona, who is kidnapped and made a child soldier in Rebelle.
— image credit: TIFF.net

The Vernon Film Society is pleased to present the 2013 Golden Globe nominated and Canada’s submission for the Academy Awards for Best Foreign Language Film, Rebelle (aka War Witch), an extraordinary portrait of survival.

Director Kim Nguyen spent 10 years bringing this story to the screen, basing his script on the stories of actual child soldiers and shooting entirely on location in the Congo.

The film is narrated by 14-year-old Komona (Rachel Mwanza), who recounts the past two years of her life to her unborn child. Abducted by a rebel army that invades her small village, Komona is  forced to commit an unthinkable act — shooting her own parents — before being dragged off into the jungle.

Over the next several months, she is inducted into the brutal lifestyle of the child soldier. She is beaten repeatedly, taught to fire an AK-47, and kept in a drugged state.

One day, as the result of a vision, Komona is the only person to escape unscathed from a ferocious fire fight.  Impressed by her premonitions, the warlord Great Tiger bestows Komona with the title of “War Witch”, which earns her both privileges in the camp and the threat of harsh punishment if her powers fail. When Komona befriends fellow soldier Magician (Serge Kanyinda), she seems to have found an escape.

The two soon run away together and eventually fall in love, but the war is never far away, and their romantic idyll is cut short when they are recaptured by the rebels. Returned to the tyranny of her former life and still haunted by the ghosts of her parents, Komona soon becomes pregnant and struggles to find a ray of hope in her desperate situation.

This is undeniably grim material, but Nguyen lightens it with delicacy and tact, conveying violence by implication and atmosphere rather than through direct depiction.

The performances from the mostly non-professional cast are vivid and authentic, particularly the extraordinary Mwanza’s portrayal of Komona, which won her the Best Actress prize at both the Berlin and Tribeca film festivals.

Heartfelt and helplessly moving, Rebelle guides us through the harsh world of a young girl whose circumstances are tragic, yet whose story is one of formidable courage and unquenchable hope.

Rebelle is in French and Lingala with English subtitles. It will be shown at the Vernon Towne Cinema Monday at 5:15 p.m. and 7:45 p.m. Tickets are available at the door and one week ahead at the theatre and the Bean Scene for $7.

 

 

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