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Trapping back before council

The contentious issue of trapping could be back on Vernon’s agenda again.

Coun. Catherine Lord has notified her colleagues that she wants them to consider asking staff to review policies around hunting and trapping.

“There’s bow hunting going on in city limits and that’s raising concern for some people,” she said.

The city was lobbied last year to ban trapping of wildlife in Vernon. In the end, council decided that the matter was a provincial jurisdiction and it would not get involved.

However, Lord says it may be time for the city to reconsider its position.

“The province has done away with enforcement. If there is minimal enforcement, I’d rather we deal with it,” she said.

Library may get bus stop

Vernon’s new library may become more accessible.

A city committee is looking at possibly having a  bus stop located at the library on 30th Avenue.

“There are issues for seniors and families with strollers,” said Coun. Juliette Cunningham.

Some residents with mobility issues have expressed concerns that the library is difficult to reach because the nearest bus stop is at Cenotaph Park on 31st Avenue.

Vernon lands conference

Arts enthusiasts from across the province will be making their way to Vernon.

The community has been selected as the site of Arts B.C.’s 2015 annual general meeting and conference.

“It’s great news for our community,” said Coun. Brian Quiring.

“We’re thinking of adding a walking tour (for delegates).”

Planning for the event will involve the North Okanagan Arts Council.

Arts B.C. is an organization that represents arts and cultural interests in the province.

East Hill plan considered

The City of Vernon is considering developing an active travel plan for East Hill.

The goal of the project would be to determine how residents get around on a daily basis.

“This is an opportunity to get good information,” said Coun. Patrick Nicol.

The initiative could be done in conjunction with university engineering students. But Coun. Catherine Lord is concerned it could put additional pressure on city staff to provide transit or other infrastructure.

“We’re getting residents’ hopes up. When we can’t do the work because we don’t have the money, it’s disheartening for them,” she said.

 

 

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