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Spallumcheen land use changes proceed

First reading has been given to a pair of land use change applications for proposed developments in Spallumcheen’s southeast sector.

Council approved first reading Monday of an official community plan amendment bylaw that proposes to change the future land use designation of the properties within the South Sub-Area of the sector from large holding and commercial to a combination of large holding, small holding, commercial and open space.

The southeast sector is located on the east side of Highway 97A between Head Road and the Swan Lake junction.

However, before second reading is done and passed, and a public hearing on the proposal is held, the developer – Willowhaven Investments – must present an engineer’s reports that identifies what, if any, improvements would be needed to existing roads.

That report must also classify proposed roads connecting to the south sub-area to support the anticipated level of traffic generated by the proposed development.

A financial cost recovery analysis for the sub-area must also be completed.

The financial cost recovery drew plenty of conversation among councillors and Mayor Janice Brown.

“I hope the financial cost recovery is not going to come back and show millions and millions of dollars in cost and take a long time for us to recover those costs,” said Brown.

“If something costs more to maintain than  the municipality is receiving in taxes, that’s what we’ll have to examine. That’s what this report is for,” said Coun. Todd York.

Administrator Greg Betts said it’s council’s call at this stage of the proposal.

“If it doesn’t look good for the community, that’s the arithmetic it comes to, then you say ‘No I don’t think so,’” said Betts.

Council approved first reading of New Town Planning’s application to change future land use designation of properties in the north sub-area from large holdings and residential to a combination of residential, low density multi-family residential, medium density multi-family residential, small holding, commercial, public institutional and open space.

New Town Planning must also have an engineer’s report prior to second reading that determines if there’s enough existing water to provide service to the proposed development without a negative impact on the existing aquifer.

A report must also be done that identifies a waste water treatment method, plant site and disposal area.

 

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