Flood response defended

Coldstream has decided to approach the provincial government about possibly diking the Kalavista lagoon or draining the lagoon

Coldstream officials insist they are doing everything to control the rising tide.

The level of Kalamalka Lake has climbed almost daily as creeks continue to pour in water, and that has created significant flooding challenges for residents and district infrastructure.

“Our staff have been very diligent in the area,” Trevor Seibel, chief administrative officer, told council Tuesday.

“We are doing what we can with the resources we have.”

And council has decided to approach the provincial government about possibly diking the Kalavista lagoon or draining the lagoon to ease flood pressures in the adjacent neighbourhood.

“If there are 60 homes involved, it would make sense for the province to look at options,” said Coun. Pat Cochrane.

On Tuesday, council heard from Kalavista Drive resident Rob McKay who isn’t impressed with the flood response so far.

“There’s no great plan or agenda. We are facing a historic flood,” he said, adding that lake levels could rise further.

“There’s a perception that we will wait until this is an emergency and then we will evacuate.”

McKay wants the lagoon drained as a way of handling ground water.

“It will become a natural sump for the whole lower area,” he said.

Coldstream staff insist provincial approvals would be needed to drain the lagoon and the water depth could make construction of a berm challenging.

“I don’t know how we would build something less than 12 feet high,” said Seibel.

In terms of flood response, Seibel says the municipality has provided sand and sandbags to residents and decisions are based on provincial information available at the time.

Staff have also been dealing with residents who are illegally pumping flood water into the sewer system which is putting pressure on the Kalavista lift station pump.