Jacob Tooke of the Canadian Enduro Development Team was in Penticton for the B.C. Enduro Series race at Three Blind Mice. Tooke, of team Smith Optics, Specialize, placed sixth in the 16 to 20 mens age group finishing in 28 minutes, 30 seconds. James Cattanach/B.C. Enduro Series

B.C. Enduro Series in Penticton gets praise

The B.C. Enduro Series pushed approximately 200 cyclists on challenging Three Blind Mice course

The B.C. Enduro Series pushed approximately 200 cyclists at Three Blind Mice on changing terrain April 30.

It’s the fourth year the event has rolled into Penticton and Dave Foot, vice-president of the Penticton and Area Cycling Association, said it went great.

“When we talk to everybody at the end of the race, they felt like it was a real enduro race course,” said Foot. “They were spent. They climbed about 1,200 metres. By the time they rode all the way back into town to the Cannery, it was about 35 kilometres. It’s a big day.”

Foot said PACA changed the course and created longer stages that were more technical. Enduro riders like black diamond trails that feature big rock rolls, jumps and steep terrain. Foot said they learn what riders have as their favourite stages and leave them in.

Related: B.C. Enduro series owner Ted Morton blogs about Penticton event

“It’s always a challenge to try to find something interesting,” he said. “Challenging and fun for the riders. Also because we ride there a lot, we want it to be fun and interesting for us to race as well.”

The day wrapped up with a street party between the Cannery and Mile Zero, which supported the street closure.

“It was a real grass roots positive vibe,” he said. “When you race with 200 people, they become 200 of your friends. It’s a real social kind of racing as well.”

Foot said they received great feedback from series owner Ted Morton, who loved the effort PACA put in for the event with everyone involved.

“It’s not a small event to try to put together,” he said.

Related: Cyclists love enduro’s Three Blind Mice

Enduro racing is un-timed climbs and timed descents. The website said the “vibe that participants just really want to get out there and explore new riding locations, ride with friends, and their love and passion for riding their bike, all whilst still getting a competitive racing aspect to it.”

“The Enduro racing has just gotten really popular as a format,” said Foot.

The first time Penticton hosted the event four years ago, it attracted 65 riders.