Okanagan company’s new cannabis grow system reduces environmental impact

BlueSky Organics eliminate thousands of tons of environmentally harmful growing cubes from landfills

BlueSky Organics has launched a new cannabis growing system to the Canadian market with the potential to eliminate millions of tons of non-biodegradable growing materials from landfills.

With the high demand for cannabis, large companies looking to take advantage of a lucrative industry are building large-scale growing facilities. Large numbers of these facilities, operated by licensed producers, traditionally use a rockwool cube for growing cannabis plants. Rockwool cubes are fiberglass-like insulation cubes used to grow cannabis roots in a hydroponic-style system.

“Our focus has been innovation and creating solutions that are superior in quality and at the same time better for the environment. This gives commercial facilities a better return on their investment. We all win,” said BlueSky’s co-owner and director of R&D, Mary Horvatincic.

Related: UBCO professor to discuss cannabis use and mental health

Related: More work for proposed rural Lumby cannabis plant

According to BlueSky, the problem is, it takes a lot of rockwool to grow high volumes of cannabis. Rockwool does not break down in the landfill.

Matt Stromsten, co-founder and director of business development for BlueSky Organics, said a large producer with 1,000,000 square feet of grow space can use as much as 60, 40ft shipping container loads of rockwool each year. This results in substantial disposal fees for producers and landfills taking in materials that will never biodegrade or break down.

Related: Interior Health adapting to legalized cannabis

BlueSky will be releasing this organically-derived, compostable alternative to rockwool in the new year through its partnership with Dutch Horticultural Professionals (DHP) to solve the rockwool problem in Canada.


@VernonNews
newstips@vernonmorningstar.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Read Local Okanagan helps readers discover the valley’s literature

Pop-up bookshop features titles by Okanagan writers

Kelowna RCMP search for missing senior

Cathy Wilson has dementia and was seen leaving her care facility in Rutland

Missing and murdered Indigenous women remembered at Vernon rally

Red Dress campaign honours the memory of missing and murdered Indigenous women across Canada

Coldstream student spends half his life as Ride Don’t Hide champion

Cole Strilchuk and his family have raised more than $40,000 for local youth mental health

Public tip leads to seizure of drugs and weapons in Vernon

Concerned citizen spots male sleeping in car in residential area

VIDEO: Driver doing laps in busy Vancouver intersections nets charges

Toyota Camry spotted doing laps in intersection, driving towards pedestrians

Every situation is different, jurors hear at coroners inquest into Oak Bay teen’s overdose death

Pediatrician says involuntary treatment necessary following overdose, opioid use

RCMP across Canada to soon unionize, according to B.C. mayor

A spokeswoman for RCMP headquarters in Ottawa says it’s not yet a done deal

Penticton baby suffers injuries from fall

Emergency crews responded to a report of a fall at a residence at 4 p.m. on June 26

Explicit sex-ed guide for adults mistakenly given to Creston elementary students

The booklet clearly states online and inside that the guide contains sexually explicit information

Driver has $240K McLaren impounded minutes after buying it in West Vancouver

Officers clocked the car travelling at 160 km/h along Highway 1 in a 90 km/h zone

Kelowna’s homeless population doesn’t have much hope of finding a bed at a shelter

Central Okanagan Journey Home Society says 300 people waitlisted for supportive housing

Still months of investigation left into South Okanagan murders

Penticton came to a standstill on April 15, when John Brittain allegedly shot and killed four people

Most Read