Wild mustard can reduce crop yields and curtail livestock forage production.

Wild mustard can reduce crop yields and curtail livestock forage production.

Bylaw trumps weed invasion

Quietly, pesky weeds have started sprouting up in fields, empty lots and yards in the Lake Country and North Westside areas.

Quietly, pesky weeds have started sprouting up in fields, empty lots and yards in the Lake Country and North Westside areas.

The Regional District of Central Okanagan’s noxious weed bylaw is in force.

“By visiting www.regionaldistrict.com/weeds, people can see photos of some of our most serious offenders and get to the root of the problem, by cutting or pulling these plant threats,” said Kim Mussenden, bylaw officer.

“A little information and knowledge can go a long way in helping people identify species that if left unchecked and growing in our yards and properties, can prevent native plants from growing.”

Right now, some of the biggest weed threats include western goat’s beard, which looks like a tall dandelion with a much larger, round seed ball; and wild mustard, with its small, bright yellow flower that can reduce crop value and yields and curtail livestock forage production on pastures.

Other varieties of weeds that are common problems in the region include knapweed, purple loosestrife and the prickly members of the thistle family, like Scotch thistle.