City urges propane safety

Problems generally occur during the maintenance of propane fueled equipment and the changing of empty cylinders

Summer is barbecue time in the Okanagan but that also means there’s a need for propane safety.

Problems generally occur during the maintenance of propane fueled equipment and the changing of empty cylinders.

“In each case, it is a matter of insuring there is no way the propane can escape,” said Lawrie Skolrood, Vernon deputy fire chief.

“It requires making sure that barbeques, lanterns, heaters, stoves or any other equipment fueled by propane are all well maintained. Keep them clean and inspect them for any worn or broken parts to insure they are free of leaks.”

When you are required to change empty cylinders with full ones, here are some tips to do it safely:

n Make sure that you take your time while replacing your empty cylinder. Ensure that the special plug provided is threaded onto the outlet of the service valve when you disconnect the hose.

n Carry the empty cylinder in the upright position with the safety valve on top.

n Older style propane cylinders are required to be tightened with a wrench.

Turning in a counter clockwise direction can tighten their left-hand threads.

Newer style propane cylinder fittings do not require a wrench and tighten in a clockwise direction.

n If your barbecue connection has an O ring, make sure you check it for fractures and cracks every time you replace your cylinder.

n Never smoke while handling a propane cylinder.

n Do not store extra propane cylinders beneath your barbecue or inside any structure as excess heat could cause the cylinder to release overpressure and propane along with it.

 

n Keep empty or full propane cylinders out of the direct sunlight, away from openings in any structure and out of the reach of small children.