Hiring veterans makes good business sense

With Remembrance Day upon us, one of the best ways to honour veterans for their sacrifice and service is to hire them

With Remembrance Day upon us, a Canadian company believes one of the best ways to honour today’s veterans for their sacrifice and service is to hire them.

Two-thirds of Canadians believe that over the last five years veterans have had a difficult (21 per cent) or somewhat difficult (45 per cent) time finding civilian jobs following their military service, according to an annual national survey commissioned by Commissionaires. The annual Nanos survey also revealed that while 75 per cent of respondents believe the federal government has the highest obligation to help vets find jobs, only five per cent rank the private sector as having the highest obligation.

“Commissionaires hires veterans every year so we understand the challenges they face. We certainly support the federal government’s efforts to assist veterans, and hope programs will be strengthened. But given the great need, we also encourage the private sector to step up,” said Bill Sutherland, National Board Chair, Commissionaires. “As we commemorate Remembrance Day, one of the best ways to honour today’s veterans for their sacrifice and service, is to hire them.”

The survey also showed that the number of Canadians who believe our support for veterans is inadequate, rose in the last 12 months, from 30 per cent to 42 per cent. Only six percent of respondents consider the support Canada gives to veterans to be adequate.

In general, the views of B.C. respondents closely paralleled the national average on most of the survey questions, but there were some variations. For instance, more than 71 per cent of British Columbians believe that over the last five years veterans have had a difficult or somewhat difficult time finding civilian jobs following their military service, while the national average was just under 66 percent. As well, while 42 percent of Canadians believe our support to veterans is inadequate, the corresponding number among British Columbians is nearly 56 per cent, a significant difference.

“We can see that veterans often have a tough time launching their post-military career,” said Dan Popowich, CEO, Commissionaires British Columbia. “So it would be nice to see more employers coming forward to hire these highly trained and committed veterans. It’s good for vets and it’s great for business.”

Since 1925, Commissionaires has been providing meaningful employment for veterans as they make the transition from the Canadian Armed Forces to civilian life. With 15 divisions and more than 20,000 men and women employed across the country, Commissionaires is a leading national provider of security services, and one of the largest employers of veterans in Canada.

Nanos Research conducted an RDD dual frame (land- and cell-lines) hybrid telephone and online random survey of 1,000 Canadians of 18 years of age or older between Aug. 20 and 23, 2015 as part of an omnibus survey.

The participants were recruited by telephone using live agents and administered a survey online. The margin of error for a random survey of 1,000 Canadians is ±3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.