Vernon Jubilee Hospital staff watch as a time capsule is buried outside the new facility

Vernon Jubilee Hospital staff watch as a time capsule is buried outside the new facility

Hospital’s history preserved

It was 64 years ago, 1947, that the old Vernon Jubilee Hospital was completed.

It was 64 years ago, 1947, that the old Vernon Jubilee Hospital was completed.

In those 64 years tremendous medical advancements have been made – the discovery of DNA,  polio and measles vaccine, Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI’S), Computed Tomography, (CT scans), and ultrasound.

The first human kidney transplant was witnessed in 1954, in 1966 the first human pancreas transplant, 1967 liver and heart transplants, 2008 saw a complete full double arms transplant as well as the first transplant of a human windpipe using a patient’s own stem cells.

And finally, in 2010, the first full facial transplant. Other discoveries were humulin insulin, capsule endoscopies, the birth control pill, DNA mapping, stem cell research, and the world wide web. As well in these past 64 years,  more than 117 antibiotics have been discovered.

“It’s a  pretty impressive timeline,” said Linda Leeson, a VJH nurse on 3east medical, and Wanda Borman, clerk in patient registration.

The two members of the Care Link team marked these milestones in conjunction with the changes occurring at the hospital recently.

“This is a proud moment for us all,” said the pair.

The Care Link team was formed last summer under the direction of Carole Falkner to create ideas and actions to support the whole of VJH by staying connected and involved with the changes at the site.

“We were sensitive to the perceptions of those departments that were not physically moving to the new tower as we didn’t want the staff and units to feel left out. Our task was to create exciting events that were inclusive. Our goal was to rejuvenate the hospital’s energy to move forward.”

Therefore the idea of a time capsule evolved.

The large time capsule’s contents were donated by every department of VJH, as well as from physicians, and Black and McDonald. Josh Dueck even donated his Olympic vest to put in the capsule.

“The time capsule  is full of photos, stories, issues in our community, thoughts on Vernon, and things that matter to us,” said the pair in their speech. “It also contains  specially chosen memorabilia  to depict our work place and the world we live in today.”

It is difficult to fathom what new discoveries and events will happen in the next 64 years.

It’s hoped when the time capsule is  opened in 2075, (64 years later) the tragedies then will be few, and the discoveries and accomplishments great.

“In 2075,  I will be 118 years old, and I predict that with the way things are going in the field of medicine, there will be a longevity pill invented, so I’m looking forward to  attending the opening ceremonies. I only hope I remember to show up,” they laughed.

Putting together the time capsule has helped everyone appreciate what each team offers in the continuum of care.

Dave Stankiewicz’ dedication and contribution  to the cause helped make the a reality, as well as Carole Falkner, for her leadership, encouragement, time and support of the Care Link team.