The Greater Vernon Museum  hosts an exhibit on the War of 1812 until Aug. 31.

The Greater Vernon Museum hosts an exhibit on the War of 1812 until Aug. 31.

Museum exhibits wartime legacy

Until Aug. 31, the Greater Vernon Museum will host an exhibition called the War of 1812 in the West: the Oregon Country Legacy

While the War of 1812 is generally associated with Eastern Canada, it was also played out in the western territory.

Until Aug. 31, the Greater Vernon Museum will host an exhibition called the War of 1812 in the West: the Oregon Country Legacy.

“While most people think of the War of 1812 in the east, there was an event on the west coast, at Astoria, Oregon, that had a major impact on the geopolitics of what we now call the Pacific Northwest, although no battles took place,” said Ron Candy, museum curator.

“The aftermath of the war and the joint occupancy of the Oregon Country by British and Americans culminated in the creation of the boundary between Canada and the U.S. from the Rockies to the Pacific, in 1846.”

Candy says the little-known story of the episode in the west is told in the exhibition with reproductions of historic images, artist’s conceptions of various events, and reproductions of artifacts from the 1812 period.

“The most surprising thing that people will learn is the origin of the Peace Arch on the border at Blaine and its connection with the War of 1812,” he said.

The exhibition is from the Osoyoos Museum and it is funded by the Department of Canadian Heritage.