Search on for aboriginal arts programs

The First Peoples’ Cultural Council invites aboriginal artists and arts organizations to submit proposals

The First Peoples’ Cultural Council invites aboriginal artists and arts organizations to submit proposals to the Aboriginal Arts Development Awards and Aboriginal Young Engaged in the Arts program by Oct. 31.

The FPCC delivers these programs with funding provided by the Government of British Columbia through the B.C. Arts Council.

“We are thrilled with the success of FPCC’s arts program, and thankful for ongoing support from our funding partners,” said Tracey Herbert, CEO, First Peoples’ Cultural Council.

“As the First Peoples’ Cultural Council continues to grow the program, it’s exciting to see Indigenous arts practices flourish as artists revive traditional practices and knowledge.”

The Aboriginal Arts Development Awards strengthen First Nations and aboriginal arts through four programs: Emerging Individual Artists, Organizations and Collectives, Arts Administrator Internships and Mentorships, and Sharing Traditional Arts Across Generations.

The Aboriginal Youth Engaged in the Arts program supports youth participation in creative and artistic activity.

The grants are open to both traditional and experimental forms of art.

In 2015-16, the FPCC distributed $877,000 to 77 projects, including:

* $100,475 awarded to 21 emerging individual artists;

* $247,145 to 14 organizations and collectives;

* $139,000 to five arts administrator internships;

* $203,380 awarded to 20 Sharing Traditional Arts Across Generations projects.

* $187,000 to 17 Aboriginal Youth Engaged in the Arts projects.

Funded projects represented all regions of the province and a range of artistic disciplines, such as visual arts, media arts, music, dance and writing.

The projects include traditional methods of beading, basketry, weaving, steaming bent boxes, creating regalia, carving, spinning, flint knapping, drumming and storytelling.

“Artistic expression is deeply rooted in Aboriginal cultures,” said Merla Beckerman, chairperson of the B.C. Arts Council.

“The B.C. Arts Council recognizes the importance of Aboriginal arts and the need to support and celebrate the rich history and present-day successes of these cultural expressions.

“By providing funding to the Aboriginal Arts Development Awards program, both traditional and contemporary Aboriginal arts practices can continue to grow and flourish, creating a positive effect in communities across British Columbia.”

For more information about the Aboriginal Arts Development Awards, visit www.fpcc.ca/arts/Programs/