Water biologist Trina Koch goes over the history of the Kalavista Lagoon as part of Earth Day interpretive clinics for the Kidston Elementary School Grade 6/7 class.

Water biologist Trina Koch goes over the history of the Kalavista Lagoon as part of Earth Day interpretive clinics for the Kidston Elementary School Grade 6/7 class.

Students pitch in at Kalavista Lagoon

Some sparkle is being planted back into a Coldstream gem.

The Kalavista Lagoon was recently the focus of a community-effort to revive the natural feature with some riparian planting.

Approximately 30 Grade 6/7 Kidston Elementary students joined community volunteers and the Society for the Protection of Kalamalka Lake (SPrKL) in celebration of Earth Month.

Students spent the day learning about the plant and animal species native to the area, planting vegetation and working on some nature-inspired artwork as part of the Kalavista Lagoon restoration and education project.

“We’re just trying to do our bit for the water quality,” said SPrKL president Louise Christie.

By reducing the amount of soil going into the lagoon and preventing further erosion of the banks, the project aims to restore the area.

“It’s a wetland that isn’t functioning very well because there’s no fresh water going in there,” said Christie.

SPrKL’s next goal with the project is to erect interpretive signs featuring some of the students’ artwork.

The recent plantings were made possible thanks to the support of the community at a recent garage sale, where $1,000 was raised.

SPrKL has also been involved in other community projects, including assisting the District of Coldstream along Coldstream Creek.

Volunteer efforts are ongoing as the society works to preserve and protect the quality and health of the Kalamalka Lake watershed.