SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH Jacqueline Mansiere, a Grade 11 student at Summerland Secondary School, will take her science fair project to the Canada Wide Science Fair in New Brunswick next month. Her project studies the effects of sound. (Photo submitted)

Summerland student examines effects of sound

Science fair project will go to national competition in New Brunswick

Jacqueline Mansiere’s science fair project, examining the effect of sound on health , will be presented at the Canada-Wide Science Fair in New Brunswick this spring.

Earlier this month, Mansiere, a Grade 11 student from Summerland Secondary School, was one of 20 students to show their science fair projects at the regional science fair in Penticton.

She is the only student from the school district to attend the national science fair, which will be held May 11 to 17.

“We’re really excited to see how Jaqueline does out there,” said Shona Becker, a science teacher at Summerland Secondary School.

Mansiere said her project began after reading how sounds could contribute to health problems for some people.

Sounds were found to cause stress and could contribute to heart and stroke issues, according to the studies she read.

However, the information she saw did not include studies of how sound affected younger, healthy people.

After researching further, she learned that sounds can affect all people.

READ ALSO: Canadian physicist who won Nobel Prize touts science for the sake of science

READ ALSO: Feds pledge money for young scientists, but funding for in-house research slips

“Sounds can have very serious health effects on all members of society,” she said.

Her tests included sounds of 50 decibels, or slightly quieter than a normal conversation, and 70 decibels, or a little lounder than a normal conversation.

She added that being in noisy places can leave people feeling exhausted.

“It’s because of the sound you’re exposed to,” she said.

Noise-cancelling pillows and noise-cancelling windows can help to reduce the amount of sound coming into a room and can help those who are noticing the effects of noisy environments.

In addition, some will choose to spend time in nature or other quiet spaces in order to get a reprieve from loud environments.

“There’s a reason people go camping or go away from cities for vacations,” Mansiere said. “It makes them feel better. It makes them feel calmer.”

Mansiere said her interest in science goes beyond the study into sounds. After high school, she would like to pursue a career in science.

“Science and math have always fascinated me,” she said.

To report a typo, email:
news@summerlandreview.com
.



news@summerlandreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Familiar advocate now executive director at Vernon’s Upper Room Mission

Nicole Makohoniuk has been named to the position, bringing with her a wealth of experience

Vernon’s Fulton Maroons prep for playoffs with romp over Mustangs

High School Rugby: Fulton beats Penticton rivals 48-7; rematch today (Tuesday), 4 p.m., Grahame Park

Vernon gears up for Bike to Work and School week

Bike to Work and School Week runs from Monday, May 27 – Sunday, June 2

Vernon tattoo fundraiser draws record support

Lineup around the block for start and beginning of Five Fathoms Tattoo event for Children’s Hospital

Electric cars gaining popularity in Vernon

Dealership sells five in one day, EV car show coming to town

Marriage proposal on the big screen at Enderby drive-in

Kelowna man gets engaged in front of hundreds to Vernon sweetheart

Car crashes into semi-truck in West Kelowna

Highway 97 heading northbound by Boucherie Rd. closed

LETTER: Fletcher ‘blurs reality’ on B.C. union public construction

Bridge, highway projects awarded to companies, not unions

Killer of Calgary mother, daughter gets no parole for 50 years

A jury found Edward Downey guilty last year in the deaths of Sara Baillie, 34, and five-year-old Taliyah Marsman

Reminder: recycle your plant pots

Plastic flowerpots and plant trays can all be recycled

South Okanagan cannabis dispensary operator that was raided is going to trial

Store operator is facing one charge of possession for the purpose of trafficking

Federal government funds millions to help B.C. police spot drugged driving

Many police departments have expressed wariness about using the only government-approved roadside test

Judge: Mississippi 6-week abortion ban ‘smacks of defiance’

The new law would prohibit most abortions once a fetal heartbeat can be detected

On-duty Vancouver cop facing dangerous driving charges after cyclist hit

The woman was taken to hospital with minor injuries

Most Read