Much of the work on the new patient care tower at Vernon Jubilee Hospital is in the final stages as the new building

Much of the work on the new patient care tower at Vernon Jubilee Hospital is in the final stages as the new building

Tower of care preparing for September opening

With only 10 weeks to go before contractors hand over the keys to the new Vernon Jubilee Hospital patient care tower, the public face of the structure has been taking on a new look recently.

The timber frame structure that will support the canopy over the main public entrance is now in place, and the entrance to the new emergency department has also been completed.

“You’ll also notice the links between the tower and the existing building are finished on the outside,” said Cam McAlpine, with the Interior Health Authority.

“Wander indoors and you’ll see the finishing touches being put on the corridors that will link the two buildings.”

The finishing of the interior of the building is moving ahead. Millwork, flooring and painting are almost complete throughout. Reviews are being conducted of the work done to date on the lower floors as Interior Health and Infusion Health ensure everything is built to high standards.

Major medical equipment, such as operating room and exam room lights, is being installed, as are OR booms. Most of the major equipment for the medical device reprocessing department has arrived and is being installed. Commissioning – putting into operation – of mechanical and electrical systems is well underway.

“The commissioning of the computer and technology systems is also in process, and the pneumatic tube system that will allow rapid sharing of test results and information between departments has now been linked from the new tower to the existing hospital,” said McAlpine.

“Weekly tours are being conducted for staff and physicians who will be working in the new tower to familiarize themselves with the new spaces and processes.”

The summer will be spent installing equipment and ensuring all staff, physicians and volunteers are fully-oriented to the new tower.

“The extensive training is necessary so that when the first patient walks through the doors Sept. 26, there will be no noticeable difference in patient care,” said McAlpine.