B.C. residents featured on reality TV show challenging Indigenous stereotypes

B.C. residents featured on reality TV show challenging Indigenous stereotypes

First Contact follows six Canadians as they learn the truth behind many racial stereotypes

Avonlea Collins says she didn’t know what kind of show it was that she was applying to when she saw the advertisement last spring, but decided to give it a go anyways.

“We didn’t hear any specifics about the show, you just applied if you considered yourself to be an adventurous, outspoken Canadian, which I think I am, so I signed up,” said Collins from her home in Chilliwack.

The show she was applying for, Collins would learn, was for the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN), and it was going to be a reality, documentary-style show, although the final details weren’t delivered until after cast members had agreed to be a part of the project.

”None of us knew what the show was going on until the end, as (the show’s producers) weren’t informative about the specifics (at the start),” explained Collins.

READ MORE: It may be ‘lights, camera, action!’ for talented Chilliwack doctor

Once selected for the show—First Contact—Collins says cast members were filled in on its purpose and the stories producers were hoping they’d have the opportunity to tell through 28 days of shooting in various locations across the country.

“At first, I was a little worried at the beginning because you’re (always) a little (scared) about how you’re going to be portrayed,” continued Collins.

“But I took that risk, jumped in two feet first, and I’m really happy I did,” said Collins emphatically. “I feel like I have received a really positive outcome from the whole experience.”

However, as they headed into the taping of the show, Collins says she struggled accepting the notion that she possessed stereotypes about Canada’s indigenous population.

Avonlea Collins (centre) tries seal for the first time. Collins, along with five others, spent 28 days travelling across Canada with a camera crew meeting Indigenous people from a variety of different cultures. APTN’s “First Contact” airs Sept. 11, at 7 p.m. (Submitted)

“I grew up in Pemberton, and all my high school life I was in school with indigenous kids and white farm kids,” said Collins. “There wasn’t a lot of diversity, but it didn’t matter. We all grew up together (and) had slumber parties. I didn’t think I had stereotypes, but through this I learned that I do.

“The biggest (stereotype I had) was believing indigenous people are receiving things from the government that I wasn’t, and it felt unfair. (But) through my journey I learned that wasn’t the case what so ever: the money they receive comes from their bands from a trust that’s (not) created (from our tax dollars).

“But now I have a (more complete) understanding of the situation and a drive to learn more,” added Collins.

A exploration into indigenous culture in Canada, First Contact is a three-part series narrated by George Stroumboulopoulos, a well-known Canadian TV personality and social justice activist.

Following the personal journeys of Collins and five other Canadians as they tour indigenous communities from coast to coast, First Contact illustrates the dichotomous relationship still surrounding indigenous communities in an attempt to challenge the perceptions and prejudices about a culture few get to fully experience.

READ MORE: B.C. artist featured on T.V. series highlighting Indigenous tattoo artistry

However, for Collins, shortly after the cameras started following her around the communities they were visiting, she experienced an epiphany: “We became able to ask nearly any question we wanted the answer to … so it made it so I was able to learn more freely, and (the stereotypes fell away) pretty quick when those questions started getting answers.”

Travelling throughout B.C., the show also went into the heart of indigenous communities in Winnipeg, Nunavut, Alberta, and Ontario.

“I couldn’t thank the communities more for (their openness and acceptance of us),” said Collins. “They truly opened up about their hardest times, which is one of the hardest things to do.”

Taping for First Contact took place over the course of 28 days earlier this spring, and during that month, Collins was not only away from both her husband and two small sons, but her contact with them was limited due to the regions they were visiting, and the director’s desire to have them live their experiences on camera, not on the phone talking to their families back home.

However, Collins says it was worth sacrificing that time with her family.

“It was bigger than me and them,” said Collins of her decision to join the show’s cast. “Now they’ll be able to look back and say, ‘Hey! That’s my mom and she did that for us!’”

More-so, Collins says it was also an incredible personal journey and she’s glad for the experience. “We went to a community in Nunavut that I was in awe of,” said the stay-at-home-mom of two.

“The beauty of it and their community, and the way they interacted with each other: it’s not about trading for money or anything, it was about uplifting each other.

“They only looked at their neighbour’s plate to make sure they had enough, not to see what they can take. They’re all incredible human beings, and I hope others can see their culture for what it truly is, not what they may think it is.

”I really just hope other people can see (the show) and see something of themselves in me and apply my learning and experience back to themselves and ask, ‘Would I have gained the same thing?’”

First Contact is a three-night television event, starting Sept. 11 at 7 p.m., comprising three episodes and a two-part reunion special featuring three of the show’s indigenous hosts along with the cast members who will reflect on their experiences before a live studio audience.


@SarahGawdin
Sarah.Gawdin@theprogress.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Avonlea Collins, a stay-at-home mom of two spent 28 days away from her family on an adventure through Indigenous Canada filming “First Contact,” which airs on ATPN on Sept. 11 at 7 p.m. (Submitted)

Avonlea Collins, a stay-at-home mom of two spent 28 days away from her family on an adventure through Indigenous Canada filming “First Contact,” which airs on ATPN on Sept. 11 at 7 p.m. (Submitted)

Just Posted

Design rendering for the proposed Coldstream Community Centre. An advisory committee will make a decision on the latest site plan Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2021. (Sahuri & Associates rendering)
Coldstream committee to review latest designs for new community centre

Design renderings have been released for the centre that would add 84 local child care spaces

A sign indicating a COVID-19 testing site is displayed inside a parking garage in West Nyack, N.Y., Monday, Nov. 30, 2020. The site was only open to students and staff of Rockland County schools in an effort to test enough people to keep the schools open for in-person learning. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
4 more deaths, 54 new cases of COVID-19 in Interior Health

This brings the total to 66 deaths in the region

Vernon now has an approved 13 cannabis shops in town. (Jennifer Smith - Morning Star)
Vernon, the ‘Pot capital of B.C.’ greenlights two new stores downtown

Two more shops, within 240 metres, approved, despite neighbouring businesses opposition

One of the two bees sculptures stolen from Vernon’s Planet Bee Honey Farm and Honeymoon Meadery Nov. 22, 2020, was retuned Jan. 26, 2021, thanks to a tip from the public. (Facebook)
Stolen bee returned to Vernon honey farm

Two months after thieves buzzed off with two bee sculptures, public tips led police one of them

Vernon North Okanagan RCMP Superintendent Shawna Baher presents Lisa Rands, of Endbery, a certificate of appreciation after she went above and beyond at the scene of a multi-vehicle collision that closed Highway 97A Jan. 6, 2021, for several hours. (RCMP)
Mounties laud woman for help at fatal crash near Enderby

Vernon RCMP honour Enderby woman for taking care of children involved in collision

Dr. Penny Ballem, a former deputy health minister, discusses her role in leading B.C.’s COVID-19 vaccination program, at the B.C. legislature, Jan. 22, 2021. (B.C. government)
B.C. holds steady with 407 new COVID-19 cases Tuesday

14 deaths, no new outbreaks in the health care system

11 more cases of COVID-19 have been linked to a cluster on Big White Mountain. Pictured above is TELUS park at Big White Ski Resort, Jan. 26. (Big White Ski Resort)
11 more cases of COVID-19 linked to Big White cluster

This brings the total case count to 225, according to health authorities in a Tuesday update

Jonathon Muzychka and Dean Reber are wanted on Canada-wide warrants. (Courtesy of Victoria Police Department)
Convicted killer, robber at large after failing to return to facility: Victoria police

Dean Reber, 60, and Jonathon Muzychka, 43, may be together

Oliver Elementary School
Former Oliver PAC treasurer charged with fraud returns to court

Belinda Yorke will be in court to fix a date for trial in February

B.C. Premier John Horgan listens during a postelection news conference in Vancouver on Sunday, Oct. 25, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
30% of B.C. recovery benefit applications held up in manual review

The province says 150 staff have been reassigned to help with manually reviewing applications

Adam Dergazarian, bottom center, pays his respect for Kobe Bryant and his daughter, Gianna, in front of a mural painted by artist Louie Sloe Palsino, Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2021, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Kobe Bryant’s presence remains strong a year after his death

Tuesday marks the grim anniversary of the crash that took their lives

Alexandra “Annabelle” Lee and her grandpa Bryan Weightman enjoyed a shopping spree at the Sicamous Askew’s foods location after Weightman won a draw for a gift card. (Submitted)
Sicamous seven-year-old fills grandparents’ shopping cart after contest win

When her grandparents won an Askew’s Foods gift card, Alexandra Lee got to handle the shopping

Surrey RCMP are investigating after a pedestrian was struck and killed at 183 Street and Highway 10 Friday night. (File photo)
The Brucejack mine is 65 km north of Stewart in northwestern B.C. (Pretivm Photo)
B.C. mine executives see bright gleam in post-COVID future

Low carbon drives demand for copper, steelmaking coal

Most Read