Jeffrey Demoe (Jackson), Zaiah Ingram (Jill), Ellen Campbell (Bunny) and Gus Hansen (Spider) in Doesn’t Time Fly, a musical theatre dinner comedy showing at the Schubert Centre from Feb. 11 to 15. (Jennifer Smith - Morning Star)

Musical comedy plays on Carnival ’60s theme

Doesn’t Time Fly flashes back to 1969, from 2019, for a group of friends who roomed together

All the big hair, tie dye and colourful antics of the ’60s are playing out in a comedic flashback to that era currently on stage in Vernon.

Doesn’t Time Fly is a two-act, dinner theatre musical production running nightly from Feb. 11-15 at the Schubert Centre.

Set in 2019, the play follows a couple who get a call from a couple they roomed with in 1969.

Despite being 50 years ago, their memories are still strong, although not always on the same page.

They recall their younger selves not having a care in the world, living off peace, love and a bit of recreational marijuana.

The split stage plays out the parallels in a funny musical, yet carrying an undertone of regret and missed opportunities.

“This year’s Carnival theme of the ’60s was really a blessing as I am one of those rare people that grew up in, and remember, the good times we had,” said writer and director Mike Poirier.

And the music was like a dream come true for Julie Armitage, the music director for the play.

“There was so much awesome music in the ’60s, she spent hours trying to choose the 11 songs we have,” Poirier said.

The youths in the cast also recently played out their skills to raise funds for the Schubert Centre, which needs a new furnace.

Staged at Home Building Centre, they stood as mannequins in the store and gave snippets of the play whenever someone dropped money in the donation bucket.

The fundraising continues throughout Carnival and the Home Building Centre will match the funds donated.

Poirier and Armitage have put on dinner theater since 2006, with a few breaks in between.

“We partnered with Winter Carnival and the Schubert Centre for several reasons,” Poirier said.

“The Winter Carnival is an amazing community participation event that allows me to write a play about our town, its citizens and to follow the Carnival theme for that year.

“The Schubert Centre was chosen as our preferred venue because of the room, availability during Carnival and Jack Gareb’s enthusiasm to have us there.”

The show runs nightly at 6 p.m., dinner at 6:30 p.m. and show at 7:30 p.m.

Tickets, $49, are available at the Vernon Winter Carnival office or at vernonwintercarnival.com or at the Schubert Centre.

READ MORE: Youth spread peace and love for Vernon seniors

READ MORE: GALLERY: Vernon Winter Carnival parade gets in the groove


@VernonNews
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