Top athletes and performers Jonathan Fraser-Monroe, who plays Charlie Dalrymple in one cast and Harry Beaton in the other, dances a daring blindfolded pas de deux with Elia Collins, who plays Charlie’s betrothed, Jean MacLaren, in Seaton’s production of Brigadoon which runs May 31 to June 4. (27th Street Theatre photo)

Top athletes and performers Jonathan Fraser-Monroe, who plays Charlie Dalrymple in one cast and Harry Beaton in the other, dances a daring blindfolded pas de deux with Elia Collins, who plays Charlie’s betrothed, Jean MacLaren, in Seaton’s production of Brigadoon which runs May 31 to June 4. (27th Street Theatre photo)

Return of live theatre sells out at Vernon high school

W.L. Seaton’s 27th Street Theatre performing Brigadoon with multi-talented cast

Rising out of the mist once every 100 years, and only for one day, is the Scottish Highland town of Brigadoon. And rising triumphantly out of the last two difficult years of COVID are the cast and crew of W.L. Seaton’s 27th Street Theatre company who are bringing this enchanting, romantic, and heart-filled classic to the stage May 31 to June 4.

The cast of 55 are a remarkably talented group of actors, singers and dancers, according to directors Lana O’Brien and Kayleigh Mace.

“The performing arts are alive and well and we are so excited to have live audiences again,” the teaching pair said.

The musical theatre company at Seaton is fortunate to draw on and utilize talents that students have fostered in many other areas of their lives. There are dancers from Okanagan School of Ballet and Accentz Dance Studio, music students from Vernon Community Music School, Centre Stage Performing Arts, Big Apple Productions as well as the Seaton band and choir programs, Highland Dancers from Aviemore School of Highland Dance and top athletes from the Sky Volleyball program.

“These students are so well rounded. Being good at lots of things will serve them well as adults. They have learned discipline and organization as well as the many artistic and athletic skills both sport and performance training provides. They are excellent role models for the younger students,” O’Brien muses.

The show sold out quickly, which tells them that people are ready to come out of isolation and see live theatre again. While there is no mask mandate, the theatre is still encouraging the audience to wear masks to help keep the community safe.

The first show of the school year was cancelled after four months of preparation when the Omicron variant kept the public out of schools in January.

But the students, once again, proved how resilient they are. They rose out of the ashes of the cancelled show and tackled the process of starting rehearsals for this production with enviable vitality and enthusiasm, O’Brien explains.

“These students kept us teachers so positive, when we were so frustrated at how things just kept shutting us down. I honestly don’t know what we would do without them. We just love them.”

While this production is already sold out, many of the company members are also performing in the Seaton Choir concert June 9 and 10, and many year-end dance recitals.

“We encourage all readers to buy tickets to everything and support the performing arts all across the city,” O’Brien said.

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