Coldstream artist to have work appear in magazine

A Coldstream artist is about to have her work published on the cover on an international magazine in commemoration of the 10th anniversary of 9/11.

Becky Strube will have her painting

Becky Strube will have her painting

A Coldstream artist is about to have her work published on the cover on an international magazine in commemoration of the 10th anniversary of 9/11.

Becky Strube’s acrylic painting, entitled Crucible of Chaos, will be the cover artwork for the September issue of American Psychologist, a magazine that has been publishing since the 1940s with an international readership in the hundreds of thousands.

Although, she has been to Ground Zero, while in New York in 2006 to sing with the Aura Chamber Choir in a concert at Carnegie Hall featuring works composed and conducted by her husband Imant Raminsh, Strube says Crucible of Chaos was not painted specifically for the 9/11 commemorative cover.

“How that search led to my art being chosen involves a bit of serendipity as well as music and poetry, which is fitting given my other interests,” she said.

Strube was given the commission after the magazine’s Toronto-based art editor, psychologist Kate F. Hays, saw her work.

Quaternity, a choral-orchestral cantata composed by Raminsh, which Strube wrote the lyrics for, was premiered in May in Toronto by the Orpheus Choir after its rousing premiere a year ago in the Okanagan.

Hays, who just happened to be singing in the choir, noticed the art reproduced on the cover of the music.

“The painting on the cover intrigued me. I had no idea who the artist was, yet the sheer energy, power and movement of the image drew my eye in,” she said.

Even with her foot in the door, Strube had to submit additional artworks, alongside five international artists invited for consideration by the magazine’s arts editors for the auspicious 9/11 issue and cover. (A recent AP cover featured well-known Canadian artist Ted Harrison.)

The U.S. editor made the final decision to feature Strube’s art.

“We searched broadly for an image that would be appropriate for this issue of the journal. The intention was to choose a painting that would be experienced a number of ways as befit the occasion, and the wide range of article topics,” said Hays.

Although an architectural designer by profession, Strube studied visual arts at the former Banff School of Fine Arts, and has studied painting in Vernon with Holly Middleton, Charlene Woodbury, Barry Rafuse, Jude Clarke, Heidi Thompson, Maria Maryniak, among others.

She has also participated in sculpture workshops with Deborah Wilson.

Strube has exhibited and sold her art in the Okanagan, served on local and provincial arts boards, and has always been an ardent arts advocate.

The September issue of American Psychologist will also include a background article both about Strube and on her art.