Allan Gill’s Lily Elegant is one of the photographs the former radiologist is showing at Bean to Cup’s Downstairs Gallery.

Allan Gill’s Lily Elegant is one of the photographs the former radiologist is showing at Bean to Cup’s Downstairs Gallery.

Photographers share unique perspectives

The Bean to Cup is featuring the photographic work of Murray Robertson and Allan Gill in its Downstairs Gallery for October.

  • Sep. 28, 2014 12:00 p.m.

The Bean to Cup is featuring the work of two local photographers in its Downstairs Gallery for October.

Murray Robertson and Allan Gill are sharing their world view through their respective lenses – one pointed at the local landscape, the other at florals from the inside on out.

Robertson was born and raised in Prince George but moved around B.C., taking his life’s path where there were many great experiences. He earned a bachelor’s in creative writing at the University of Victoria, became an electronics technician, and years later rediscovered photography.

“It took me very little time to discover how to make a camera work to create the images I want to capture,” said Robertson. “I really love shooting and sharing my photos with people.”

Robertson shares his photos online with thousands of viewers through his Google+ photography page.

Gill spent his professional career working in radiology and knew there was more to the world than just what can be seen through the lens of big X-ray machines.

He discovered his “unseen world” and decided to apply the idea to fine art photography.

With technical assistance from collaborators who have expertise in radiology, Gill has created many images of Mother Nature’s floral palette. The skill of a radiologist using X-ray equipment, combined with Gill’s intuition and talent as a photographer, bring to life the hidden beauty within the world of each flower.

“The nearly transparent, delicate features of the petals risk being lost during the process of establishing the hidden contents of the stems and buds of each flower, but the photo-manipulative modifications bring out the overlapping lines and shape,” said Gill. “The resulting images have a translucent, almost ethereal glow, showing leaves, veins and internal structures in a delicate balance not possible with conventional photography.”

Gill’s work has been featured in numerous international photography magazines and is currently represented by a number of galleries in Canada, the U.S., Europe and the Middle East.

Opening night for both men’s exhibitions is Wednesday, Oct. 1 from 6:30 to 9 p.m. The artists will be on hand to talk to and meet with the public. A portion of all butter chicken dinners and chai lattés (any size) sold will be donated to Kindale Developmental Association.