Research suggests that music makes the food and retail experience a lot more jolly

A new study conducted by SOCAN and Leger shows that music has a substantially positive impact on dining and shopping.

As those in the North Okanagan make the most out of the holiday season – eating, drinking, shopping and making merry – new research suggests that listening to music enhances those experiences.

A new study conducted by SOCAN (the Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada) and Leger, The Research Intelligence Group, shows that music has a substantially positive impact on dining and shopping.

In the survey it was revealed that 78 per cent of Canadians said that hearing music in a restaurant makes them enjoy their food and drink more, and almost three-quarters said it makes them want to stay longer.

Among other findings, 84 per cent of bar, restaurant and retail owners surveyed credited music for helping to create a more positive experience, while two-thirds of the Canadian public agreed that music impacts their decision to return to or recommend a restaurant.

In fact, more than two-thirds of business owners said that live music attracts more customers, and more than half agreed that live music gives them an edge over their competition.

“Music is the food of fun, so play on,” said Leslie Craig, SOCAN’s director of licensing. “The results from our food and music survey support the fact that Canadian businesses and their customers agree that music is integral to enjoying food and drink and to staying in a restaurant, bar or retail store longer.”

More than a quarter of Canadians surveyed (28 per cent) revealed that they would have a negative reaction to being in a restaurant without music and, of those, 43 per cent said they’d be unlikely to return. Twenty per cent said they’d feel the need to leave.

Thirty-four per cent of Canadians surveyed said that if they knew a restaurant was paying its legal and fair license for music, it would influence their decision to go there.

The same can be said for grocery and retail stores. More than half of Canadians said they are likely to enjoy their shopping experience more when they hear music in a retail store. About one-third even admit to dancing or singing in grocery store aisles, and 25 per cent said would be likely to inquire about the music being played.

“While music helps to build the experience for consumers, it also rewards the more than 125,000 businesses using licensed music to make their business better and compensate music creators fairly for their work. Businesses that are licensed to play through SOCAN know the value that music always adds, and especially during the holidays,” said Craig.

For a thorough summary of the study, visit the Music is the Food of Business report at www.socan.ca.

 

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