Julianne Moore plays a linguists professor and mother of three who receives a devastating  health diagnosis in the film Still Alice. It opens the 21st annual Vernon International Film Festival at the Towne Cinema Feb. 27 to March 5.

Julianne Moore plays a linguists professor and mother of three who receives a devastating health diagnosis in the film Still Alice. It opens the 21st annual Vernon International Film Festival at the Towne Cinema Feb. 27 to March 5.

See some Oscar noms, and perhaps wins, at Vernon Int’l Film Festival

Foreign, indie and Oscar nominated films will be shown at the Vernon Towne Cinema, with screenings from Friday Feb. 27 to Thursday, March 5.

Film fans can unite in celluloid goodness when the Vernon Film Society presents its 21st annual Vernon International Film Festival.

Foreign, indie and Oscar nominated films will be shown at the Vernon Towne Cinema, after the Academy Awards this weekend, with screenings from Friday Feb. 27 to Thursday, March 5.

The festival opens with Still Alice, Feb. 27 at 5:15 p.m., featuring Oscar nominated actress, and predicted winner, Julianne Moore as a college professor who is diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s disease.

“Ms. Moore shares her journey with boundless generosity. She makes you feel what it’s like to lose the wind beneath your wings,” reads a review from The New York Observer.

Two Days, One Night (Feb. 27 at 7:45 p.m.) stars fellow Oscar nominated actress, and 2007 winner for La Vie En Rose, Marion Cottilard who plays a Belgian mother who has only the weekend to convince her fellow employees why she should be able to keep her job when she discovers they have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal.

The film is in French with English subtitles.

Feb. 28 at 5:15 p.m. is Citizenfour (nominated for an Oscar for Best Documentary Feature), which follows American filmmaker Laura Poitras and fellow journalist Glenn Greenwald who travel to Hong Kong for the first of many meetings with computer analyst and National Security Agency whistle-blower Edward Snowden.

Nominated for five Oscars, including Best Actor for Steve Carrell and Best Supporting Actor for Mark Ruffalo, Foxcatcher (Feb. 28 at 7:45 p.m.) is the true-life story about Olympic champion wrestlers and brothers, Mark and Dave Schultz, who became members of Team Foxcatcher, a club created by du Pont family heir John E. Du Pont.

The life and art of one of Britain’s most famous Romantic-age landscape artists J.M.W. Turner can be seen in director Mike Leigh’s biopic Mr. Turner, starring Timothy Spall, March 1 at 5:15 p.m.

March 1 at 8 p.m. is German film Phoenix, about a disfigured concentration-camp survivor, unrecognizable after facial reconstruction surgery, who searches ravaged postwar Berlin for the husband who might have betrayed her to the Nazis. The film is in German with English subtitles.

Dustin Hoffman stars as the demanding leader of a angel-voiced boys’ choir from an elite East Coast boarding school in the film Boychoir, March 2 at 5:15 p.m.

March 2 at 7:45 p.m., Leviathan (nominated for Best Foreign Language Film) is the story of a man from a small town forced to fight the corrupt mayor when he is told that his house will be demolished.

The film is in Russian with English subtitles.

Drama Winter Sleep, the only film to be shown March 3 at 5:15 p.m., won the Palme d’Or at the 2014 Canne Film Festival and examines the significant divide between the rich and poor as well as the powerful and powerless in Turkey.

It is in Turkish with English subtitles.

On March 4 at 5:15 p.m. is The Humbling, starring Al Pacino as a stage actor who is slowly losing his mind and engages in a relationship with a sexually confused younger woman (Greta Gerwig of Frances Ha fame).

March 4 at 7:45 p.m. is Canadian filmmaker Xavier Dolan’s Mommy, the Jury Prize winner at Cannes about a widowed single mother who is raising her violent son alone and finds new hope when a mysterious neighbour inserts herself into their household. 

Postponed due to the snowstorm in January, Pride is now being shown as part of the VFS film festival, March 5 at 5:15 p.m. It follows the true story of U.K. gay activists who work to help miners during their lengthy strike of the National Union of Mineworkers in the summer of 1984.

The final film, March 5 at 7:45 p.m., is Elsa & Fred, starring Shirley MacLaine and Christopher Plummer, in the English-language remake of the 2005 Argentinian film of the same name. The  romantic comedy shows two elderly people whose paths cross unexpectedly: the recently widowed, mild-mannered Fred and the unpredictable Elsa, who shakes things up in his life.

Admission to all films is $7 each (cash only), or $30 for a five-film pass, good for any number of people for any films, available in advance starting Friday at the Towne or the Bean Scene. Pass holders should be in the theatre at least 15 minutes before the film starts to ensure a seat. Doors open nightly at 4 p.m. More information is available at vernonfilmsociety.bc.ca.