Freda Ens, who worked supporting families through the Robert Pickton case shares her experience with an audience of 80 during the MMIW gathering and information session at the Splatsin Centre in Enderby. (Erin Christie/Morning Star)

Missing women remembered at Enderby gathering

Between 1997 and 2000 the homicide rate for indigenous women was higher than non-indigenous women.

WATCH:

Brenda Wilson tries hard not to think about the milestones her sister has missed over 24 years following her death.

“Birthdays, weddings — her graduation. She will never experience those things because she was taken from us,” Wilson told the audience at a gathering in Enderby Monday morning.

Murdered and Missing Women (MMIW) Drone Search Team president, Jody Leon said stories like Wilson’s highlight the need to keep the five women who have gone missing from the North Okanagan over the last two years at the forefront of people’s minds, and in the media.

Caitlin Potts, 27; Ashley Simpson, 32; Deanna Wertz, 46; Nicole Bell, 31 and Traci Genereaux, 18 were reported missing between March 2016 and September 2017 — human remains found at a Silver Creek property between Vernon and Salmon Arm in November 2017 were later confirmed to be those of Genereaux.

The event, hosted by Splatsin First Nation, included caseworkers, advocates, members of the MMIW Drone Search Team,volunteers, elders, drummers and members of local law enforcement.

Ramona Wilson was 16 in 1994 when she disappeared from Smithers, where she and her family had been living.

In April 1995, 10 months after her disappearance, Ramona’s family received the form of closure Wilson said most families of missing women never get.

Her sister’s remains were located in a shallow grave along a treeline by the local airport — just outside of town.

“It wasn’t her body, it was her remains that were found,” Wilson said.

“We were told we had to go down to the police station to identify her and when we walked in there was a table like the one I am standing behind right now, and they had laid out all of her belongings. The thing I will never forget is the smell,” she recalled as her voice began to crack.

“I could smell the earth on her clothing… that will never leave me.”

Ramona’s case — like so many that occurred between Prince Rupert and Prince George — remains unsolved.

The Highway of Tears, as that corridor is now called, has been the site of the disappearance or the discovery of the remains of roughly 30 indigenous women since 1969.

A memorial walk for Ramona is held in June each year in Smithers. This year’s walk takes place June 9.

Freda Ens, who worked supporting families of the missing women through the Robert Pickton case as head of the Police and Native Liaison Society echoed Wilson’s frustration while describing the lengthy process of lobbying for recognition from various levels of government during the trial period.

“It took years for the pattern of disappearances to be recognized,” she said.

While Ens refused to comment on the context of her speech regarding Pickton at Monday’s gathering, which focused primarily on the four women missing from the North Okanagan, she offered advice to the families looking for answers.

“Whatever you do, don’t give up,” she said.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Jody Leon (left), co-organizer of the MMIW Drone Search Team stands next to the sign of missing and murdered women in Enderby with Jane and Dennis Aubertin, the parents of Nicole Bell who has been missing from Sicamous since September, during a fundraiser for the Drone Search Team on April 28. The sign will remain in front of the Splatsin Centre in Enderby to bring attention to the missing and murdered women. More then $700 was raised Saturday in support of the team. (Tobias Fredereksen/Morning Star)

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Interior Health will not expand Police and Crisis Team

Southeast Division Chief Superintendent Brad Haugli asked IH to expand the program

COVID-19 closes Cherryville gift shop

CherryBee Boutique among the consignment shops clearing the shelves

Haze over Okanagan and Shuswap skies may have drifted from Siberia

Few active wildifres so far this summer in B.C.

City of Vernon offers grants for local sustainability projects

Small grants of up to $1,000 will be made available

Vernon’s O’Keefe Ranch launches ‘macabre’ summer ghost tours

Gabriel Newman II has run the tours for the last 17 years

UPDATE: Military reservist facing 22 charges after allegedly ramming gates at Rideau Hall

The man, who police have not yet officially identified, will be charged with multiple offences

LETTER: Questions raised about Summerland solar project

Site of proposed project has been considered for previous initiatives

Alberta health minister orders review into response after noose found in hospital in 2016

a piece of rope tied into a noose was found taped to the door of an operating room at the Grande Prairie Hospital in 2016.

LETTER: Solar project discussion should have been public

Decision by Summerland council was made during a closed session

B.C.’s major rivers surge, sparking flood warnings

A persistent low pressure system over Alberta has led to several days of heavy rain

B.C.’s Indigenous rights law faces 2020 implementation deadline

Pipeline projects carry on as B.C. works on UN goals

Shuswap Lake algae bloom being monitored, not considered harmful

Dangerous toxins not found in June 30 water quality test

Slow season at Okanagan U-pick farms

Lake Country farm owner Bruce Duggan said the rainy weather is turning people away

Not a chef: Cooking in COVID

Okanagan resident Andrew Levangie writes a new food column for Black Press Media

Most Read