Stem cell therapy may help you regain an active lifestyle. Learn more at two free seminars, coming to the Okanagan.

Stem cell therapy may help you regain an active lifestyle. Learn more at two free seminars, coming to the Okanagan.

Make it stop: Stem cell therapy to target chronic pain

Free Okanagan seminars show you how to get back to your healthy, active lifestyle

If chronic pain has brought your active lifestyle to a standstill, help is available to get you back to where you want to be.

Today’s regenerative medicine offers a new approach to treatment that helps to heal your sore and injured tissue, meaning if you suffer from injured or degenerative conditions in your back, knees, hips, shoulders or other arthritic joints, stem cell therapy may help get you back in action.

What is Stem Cell therapy?

Stem cell therapy uses your body’s healthy stem cells to replace or activate your own stem cells at an injured site, explains Dr. David Vanos from the Spokane, Wash.-based Stem Cell Solutions NW, in the Okanagan for two free, no-commitment information seminars April 23 and 24.

When you have damaged tissue anywhere in your body, the damaged tissue sends out signals to attract your body’s own stem cells. Unfortunately, as you age, the number of stem cells in your body and their potency significantly decreases. The result is a dramatic decrease in your healing ability.

However, introducing large amounts of regenerative factors to the injured tissue can substantially increase your body’s healing potential and ability. A stem cell is unique because of its ability to turn into any type of cell in your body – it’s the essential building block of life.

“This injection of stem cells, either from the patient or a donor, along with other growth factors is believed to activate your body’s own stem cells to start healing the injured tissue,” says Dr. Vanos, board-certified in pain management.

Who can benefit?

Dr. Vanos and his medical team are committed to returning patients to a pain-free, healthy lifestyle, including sports, travel, gardening, family and work. Regenerative therapy can:

· Help your body improve and strengthen cartilage, tendons, discs and other connective tissue

· Modulate your immune system, with the potential to improve or stop auto-immune diseases

· Prevent your own cells from dying prematurely

· Prevent and break down fibrotic tissue or scar tissue

While stem cell therapy shows considerable promise for many people, “the key to our very high success rate is to only treat patients who we think we can help,” Dr. Vanos explains, noting that all treatments at the clinic are performed by board-certified physicians and products come from FDA-certified laboratories that meet the strongest industry standards.

Learn more: Two FREE seminars are coming to the Okanagan: Monday, April 23 at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. at the Delta Grand Marriott, 1310 Water St., Kelowna, and Tuesday, April 24 at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. at the Sandman Hotel, 939 Burnaby Ave., Penticton.

Seating is limited – reserve today at 833-823-0101.

Learn more at StemCellSolutionsNW.com

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