What are your precious metals worth? 5 reasons to find out

Precious Metals Recycling Roadshow rolls into Vernon Oct. 5 & 6

Curious what your collection of silver, gold, coins and Canadian paper money is worth? Find out at the Precious Metals Recycling Roadshow, at the Vernon Lodge Oct. 5 and 6.

B.C.’s Ursa Major Gold, Silver & Coin will provide assessments between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. both days, with no appointment required. If you decide the time is right to sell, they can help you with that too.

“We have the unique advantage of dealing direct with a smelter, allowing us to cut out one or even two middlemen,” explains Barry Dick, precious metals buyer and president of Ursa Major, which purchases gold and silver from other gold buyers, pawn shops, dentists, jewellers and jewellery makers as well as the general public.

Building a career from a lifelong passion, Dick’s first gold claim was in the 1970s at age 16 and he was a regular at the world gold panning championships with a personal best of third place.

So why visit the Precious Metals Recycling Roadshow?

  1. Trust. Ursa Major analyzes your gold, silver, coins and paper money while you watch, with the process explained in detail. Coins with numismatic value are graded and separated from those with a “melt” value. Silver, such as jewellery and flatware, are analyzed for hallmark identification, as are pieces believed to contain gold. Gold is then confirmed using precise testing while you watch. A cash offer is made and clients decide whether to sell or not, Dick says, noting Ursa Major has extensive experience working respectfully with estates, executors, widows and widowers.
  2. Knowledge. “If you decide to sell after hearing the quote, great, but it’s also about information,” Dick says. “A lot of times people just need to know a ballpark of what things are worth; we don’t pressure anyone into selling.”
  3. Value for sellers. Against the US dollar, gold and silver prices appear low but the weak Canadian dollar means prices are strong, Dick notes.
  4. Eco-friendly solution. “Nearly half of the world’s annual gold harvest comes from recycled gold. Energy costs are about $500 to mine a new ounce of gold, while for recycled gold it’s only about $10 per ounce. That prevents a lot of diesel from being burned,” Dick says. Gold and silver purchased at the show and later melted returns to the market without incurring that environmental cost – out-of-fashion or unloved jewellery, single earrings, broken chains, charm bracelets, dental gold, nuggets and fine gold are all accepted.
  5. Another side of the coin. People are also encouraged to bring in coins for assessment, in addition to Canadian and Dominion of Canada paper money. “We can assess any coin ever made for collector or precious metal value, including world coins and ancient coins,” Dick says.

Visit the Precious Metals Recycling Roadshow at the Vernon Lodge, 3914-32nd St., from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday and Friday, Oct. 5 and 6.

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