An inspector decontaminates a boat at one of the provinces 10 roadside invasive mussel inspection stations. Photo by East Kootenay News Online Weekly.

An inspector decontaminates a boat at one of the provinces 10 roadside invasive mussel inspection stations. Photo by East Kootenay News Online Weekly.

20 mussel-fouled watercraft prevented from entering B.C. this summer

79 tickets, 44 warnings issued to those who failed to stop at inspection stations

Inspection stations, when they are open, are helping in the prevention of keeping invasive mussels from harming Okanagan area lakes.

Since inspection stations opened in the province on April 1, 20 mussel-fouled watercraft were intercepted entering B.C., according to the September report from the Okanagan Basin Water Board.

The majority of these vehicles were travelling from Ontario, with eight travelling from the U.S. B.C.’s inspection team received advanced warning about 15 of the 20 watercraft from other state or provincial inspection teams.

In addition, 79 tickets and 44 warnings were issued for failing to stop at an inspection station, which is a requirement under provincial law. Nine inspection stations opened in April, while three more opened in May.

Related: Okanagan water board seeks mussels funding

After a recent funding announcement in August from the federal government to address invasive mussels, the OBWB sent a letter to Hon. Jonathan Wilkinson, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans, and the Canadian Coast Guard, thanking the government for its support. The letter also requested further actions be taken to protect B.C. waters.

The board first requested specific actions in April 2018 to increase efforts in educating the public, monitoring local water bodies, and incident preparedness. One action in particular, expanding inspection timing and activities, may make all the difference, according to Corinne Jackson, communications director with OBWB.

“These stations do not run 24-hours a day, so who knows how many watercraft may be coming in under our radar,” said Jackson.

Related: Boil water advisory issued for Falkland system

The board’s outreach program Okanagan WaterWise has started the campaign ‘Don’t Move a Mussel’ to educate the public about the harmful effects of invasive mussels, such a zebra or quagga, and how to reduce the risk of transporting them.

“These invasive mussels promote toxic algae which would pollute our drinking water. They also clog drinking water intakes and distribution systems. It could cost millions of tax dollars to clean them out of pipes or retrofit systems,” states the website DontMoveaMussel.ca.

As of Sept. 13, the OBWB has not received a response to their letter. It is anticipated that the province will provide an update in the next few weeks about its efforts in 2018 regarding this issue.

For more information about invasive mussels and the risks they pose, visit www.dontmoveamussel.ca.

To report a typo, email: editor@pentictonwesternnews.com.

Jordyn Thomson | Reporter

JordynThomson

Send Jordyn Thomson an email.
Like the Western News on Facebook.
Follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Loud beats reverberate through the room as Total Fitness Zumba class participants follow along to the instructor’s moves during a drop-in fundraiser for the Shannon Sharp Learning Circle to be constructed at Salmon Arm West School. (Lachlan Labere/Salmon Arm Observer)
City-run fitness classes paused in Vernon

Greater Vernon Recreation Services pauses play in wake of province’s new health orders

Welcome Lars, the elf. Vernon Jubilee Hospital Foundation's newest representative for the Light a Bulb campaign. (Contributed)
Vernon hospital welcomes new elf for Light a Bulb campaign

The passing of candy cane from elf-to-elf warrants a colouring contest!

(Morning Star file photo)
Lumby bylaw complaints skyrocket in 2020

Bylaw officers have seen an 80 per cent increase in complaints over 2019, with two months yet to be recorded

Greater Vernon Water rates will increase an average of 2.4 per cent over the next four years after the Regional District of North Okanagan adopted a new water rate bylaw on Wednesday, Nov. 18. (File photo)
Regional District North Okanagan approves four-year water rate bylaw

Water rates for Greater Vernon Water users to climb an average of 2.4 per cent over the four years

A new primary health clinic at the Okanagan Indian Band Health Centre is now providing members with doctors on reserve. (Stock photo)
New Okanagan Indian Band primary care clinic now accepting patients

The clinic is giving OKIB members access to doctors and nurses on reserve

A man wearing a face mask to help curb the spread of COVID-19 walks in downtown Vancouver, B.C., Sunday, Nov. 22, 2020. The use of masks is mandatory in indoor public and retail spaces in the province. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. records deadliest day of pandemic with 13 deaths, 738 new COVID-19 cases

Number of people in hospital is nearing 300, while total cases near 30,000

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

FILE - This May 4, 2020, file photo provided by the University of Maryland School of Medicine, shows the first patient enrolled in Pfizer's COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine clinical trial at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore.  Pfizer announced Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2020, more results in its ongoing coronavirus vaccine study that suggest the shots are 95% effective a month after the first dose. (Courtesy of University of Maryland School of Medicine via AP, File)
VIDEO: B.C. planning for the rollout of COVID-19 vaccines in the first weeks of 2021

The question of who will get the vaccine first relies on Canada’s ethical framework

This undated photo issued by the University of Oxford shows of vial of coronavirus vaccine developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University, in Oxford, England. (University of Oxford/John Cairns via AP)
Canada can make vaccines, just not the ones leading the COVID-19 race

Canada has spent more than $1 billion to pre-order seven different developing COVID-19 vaccines

British Columbia Premier John Horgan speaks during an announcement about a new regional cancer centre in Surrey, B.C., on Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020. Horgan is set to introduce his NDP government’s new cabinet Thursday. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Horgan’s NDP cabinet built to tackle pandemic, economic recovery, says former premier

Seven former NDP cabinet ministers didn’t seek re-election, creating vacancies in several high-profile portfolios

Central Okanagan Public Schools administration office in Kelowna. (File photo)
COVID-19 confirmed in 5 more Central Okanagan schools

All people who tested positive for the virus are self isolating at home

Penticton Law Courts
Bail hearing for Penticton man charged with sex assault, forcible confinement

Robert Sauve is facing more than 10 criminal charges

The COVID-19 test centre at Peace Arch Hospital is located on the building’s south side. (Tracy Holmes photo)
B.C. woman calls for consistency in COVID-19 post-test messaging

‘Could we just get one thing straight?’ asks Surrey’s Deb Antifaev

Revelstoke RCMP warn of scam after two people targeted in one day. (Black Press file photo)
Revelstoke RCMP warn of scammer pulling at heart strings

Two people in Revelstoke targeted in one day by person posing as a loved one

Most Read