The Armstrong Curling Club is planning a homecoming event for 2017.

The Armstrong Curling Club is planning a homecoming event for 2017.

Armstrong Curling Club shot down

The Armstrong Curling Club was denied a grant from the federal government’

Too much history, not enough celebration.

That’s the reason the Armstrong Curling Club was denied a grant from the federal government’s Canadian Heritage Canada 150 program to help with a homecoming weekend the club has planned in 2017.

“The reason our application was denied is because our event was too focused on history and not enough on celebratory,” said Terri Nicholson, curling club president, in a presentation to Spallumcheen council.

“We are disappointed, but would still like to be able to put on our homecoming celebration at the end of May 2017.”

The event, which happens during Canada’s 150th birthday celebrations, is slated to span three days. It will showcase the history of curling in the Armstrong area, salute old curlers and culminates with a banquet on the Saturday night.

“A lot of volunteer effort has already gone into updating our club in preparation for the event,” said Nicholson. “We have more volunteers coming forward all the time to help.”

Nicholson said the organizing committee is likely looking at being about $5,000 short in its budget plans.

The club has asked the township for $2,500 and will ask the same from the City of Armstrong.

The township asked the club to apply for a 2017 grant-in-aid.

No thanks

Spallumcheen is not interested in participating in a proposal on strategic management decisions regarding local forests.

Dr. Bill Bourgeois, president of New Direction Resource Management, made the presentation on the proposal to the Regional District of North Okanagan directors in July.

He said estimated costs for RDNO to participate in the pilot project would be $10,000, split among the communities.

The objective of the plan is to prepare communities for providing meaningful advice on strategic management decisions regarding local forests.

Coun. Christine Fraser believes Spallumcheen has that.

“Our trails society is very well aware of the sensitivities of the area,” said Fraser. “This would be a waste of money.”

Council voted unanimously to express no interest in taking part in the pilot project.