This black bear visited the same area of Saanich a few years ago. (Courtesy Saanich Police Department)

This black bear visited the same area of Saanich a few years ago. (Courtesy Saanich Police Department)

Black bear and cubs spotted in Salmon Arm park

The city is warning residents about the bears in the well-used trail system.

The City of Salmon Arm has issued a heads-up for hikers after a mother bear and her cubs were spotted in a popular public park.

On the afternoon of May 8, the city warned residents about the bears that had been spotted in Little Mountain Park using their Facebook page.

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According to Wild Safe BC, almost all of B.C. is bear country, and Salmon Arm is no exception.

Wild Safe notes that bears generally wake up from their winter hibernation in April and after waking begin to feed, replacing the 30 per cent of their body weight they lost while in their dens.

This search for food sometimes leads the bears into populated areas. According to Wild Safe a bear traveling through a community without interacting with people or their property is unlikely to cause conflict. Conflict becomes more likely when bears start taking advantage of human-created sources of food. food sources to be mindful of include garbage, compost and pet food stored outdoors.

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When venturing out of populated areas or into an area where bears are known to be, Wild Safe recommends keeping an eye out for bear signs including scat, tracks and claw marks on trees. While in an area where bears are known to be it is advisable to talk or sing while walking in order to avoid a surprise encounter with a bear. It is also best to hike in groups.



jim.elliot@saobserver.net

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