Surrey RCMP on the scene of vehicle crash in Cloverdale, B.C. (Grace Kennedy photo)

Canadian police chiefs launch professionalism survey

This is the second national survey by the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police Ethics Committee

Police agencies from across Canada will be taking part in a nation-wide survey to address professionalism in policing, starting this month.

This survey is a follow-up to the study on ethics in Canadian policing, published in 2012 by the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police (CACP). The ethics survey was the first of its kind in the world, according to a Delta Police Department press release, and saw 10,000 members from 31 police departments take part.

The newest survey will take a look at some of the results from the 2012 study, and show the impact of any changes made in regards to work environment and conditions, supervision, communications, decision making, management and community engagement.

“There have been some significant changes in the environment since the last survey,” said Delta Police Chief Neil Dubord, co-chair of the CACP Ethics Committee, which commissioned the survey. “We’ve seen tremendous growth in the role of social media, which has both positive and negative implications for policing.

“A key issue with social media is that what happens with police forces in other countries impacts the public perception of, and potentially interactions with, Canadian police officers.”

More than 30 police departments from across the country at set to take part in the newest survey, which will include civilian employees as well as police officers.

“This second survey will give our police forces the chance to assess the changes they may have implemented after the first survey, and also look at new areas, such as interactions with the public,” said CACP Ethics Committee co-chair and Gatineau Police deputy director François Duguay.

“This should help all our police leaders take a good look at the challenges we face in maintaining public trust and confidence, and how we can better communicate with all our staff in meeting those challenges.”



grace.kennedy@northdeltareporter.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Charges pending after accident cuts power in Lumby

A single vehicle accident cut power to 1,905 Whitevale and Lumby residents Saturday, July 21

UPDATE: Sentencing hearing set for Coldstream standoff defendant

Kelly Blake Torvik will appear in Vernon Law Courts July 24 for sentencing

Motorcyclist taken to hospital following crash near Vernon

Extent of injuries not yet known following motorcycle in ditch on Commonage Road Sunday, July 22

Okanagan Wildfires: An afternoon update on wildfires and evacuations

A Sunday afternoon look at the major wildfires impacting the Okanagan and Similkameen.

All-Indigenous teams break new ground, making BC Games history

This is the first time there have been dedicated Indigenous teams at the BC Summer Games

Vernon poet shines bright light on struggle with homelessness

Book launch for John La Greca’s Homeless Memorial is at Gallery Vertigo July 21

The Northern Secwepemc te Qelmucw people signed an agreement-in-principle with the B.C. government

The signing ceremony, at the Eliza Archie Memorial School, was 25 years in the making

Canada to resettle dozens of White Helmets and their families from Syria

There are fears the volunteers would become a target for government troops

Francesco Molinari wins British Open at Carnoustie

It is his first win at a major and the first by an Italian

Government sets full-time salary range for Justin Trudeau’s nanny

At its top range, the order works out to a rate of $21.79 per hour, assuming a 40-hour work week

Mediation talks break off in casino strike

Gateway and BCGEU have no new date set for mediation

Most Read