District restricts road signs

Coldstream officials are trying to find the balance between encouraging entrepreneurs and ensuring roadsides aren’t covered in advertising

Coldstream officials are trying to find the balance between encouraging entrepreneurs and ensuring roadsides aren’t covered in advertising.

The district has agreed to a sign at the Kalavista Drive boat launch indicating marina gas sales at Coldstream Market although the business had requested directional signage throughout the community.

“We have to be very careful,” said Coun. Pat Cochrane.

“We don’t want to see signs everywhere but we want to support our businesses, including those involved in agriculture.”

There currently is a policy for directional signs to private commercial establishments, and it allows up to five signs to be installed along roadsides.

However, staff says they are uncertain to the original intent of the policy and suggest there could be ramifications if the term commercial establishment is broadly interpreted.

“If taken literally, we could see a plethora of directional signage for many of the commercial properties,” said Michael Stamhuis, chief administrative officer, in a written report.

“Staff suggest that such directional signage has value when the facilities or establishments cater to a non-local clientele who would actually benefit from such direction.”

Mayor Jim Garlick believes a marine gas sign on Kalavista Road is suitable because it will assist non-local users of the boat launch.

“We want to show people from outside of the areas where the services are,” he said.

As a result of a staff recommendation, council has amended the directional sign policy so it applies only to businesses catering to non-local clientele.