Enderby budget unfolds

Enderby budget unfolds

Council had its first discussion about the 2017 budget Monday and it includes a proposed two per cent tax hike

Enderby politicians are trying to stick to the cost of living.

Council had its first discussion about the 2017 budget Monday and it includes a proposed two per cent tax hike.

“There’s an infrastructure component we put aside every year and the rest is for operating,” said Mayor Greg McCune.

The tax increase would translate into an additional $33 for the average household, and McCune insists council understands that the economy is difficult for some residents.

“It’s a struggle every day for most people,” he said.

“You can move forward as a community and not have an eight or nine per cent tax increase.”

The total operating budget has increased by a net amount of $19697 for 2017.

In terms of capital, the projects include $1 million for the phase one of Salmon Arm Drive upgrades and $288,602 for the hillside combined sewer separation.

Public input into the 2017 budget will occur April 18 and the financial plan could be adopted May 1.

Health umbrella sought

Enderby wants to pull health and social services together under one roof.

City officials have been working with University of B.C. Okanagan students to develop a plan for a common approach to community programs.

“We’re trying to incorporate services like drug and alcohol counselling or job counselling,” said Mayor Greg McCune, adding that it would create convenience for residents.

“We would like a standalone building that encompasses everything.”

The UBC students have been looking at the feasibility of such a plan.

“They have given us the groundwork on where we want to go,” said McCune.