Enderby residents and politicians would like to see a spray park brought back to the community but the cost of building a new park is the only hurdle.

Enderby residents and politicians would like to see a spray park brought back to the community but the cost of building a new park is the only hurdle.

Enderby eager to reinstate spray park

The desire is there from residents and politicians alike to bring a spray park back to Enderby, but the funds aren’t

The desire is there from residents and politicians alike to bring a spray park back to Enderby, but the funds aren’t.

“Our city lacks safe, enjoyable, affordable family-friendly amenities, especially in our hot summer months,” said Rebecca Shuert, a local business owner, long-time resident and mother of two.

The Barnes Park spray park was closed last year because of concerns children may slip and hurt themselves from Interior Health Authority.

“It was a big concern to us when we had to close it down,” said Enderby Coun. Brad Case.

To have the old, decaying spray park still in view but unusable is “a sad sight,” says Shuert.

And while the old site would still make a great location for a new park, Case notes: “It’s a very expensive proposition to put one of those in.”

In Lumby, the spray park and fitness equipment installed earlier this year cost $435,322, with Lumby and Cherryville taxpayers contributing $57,064, the provincial government pitching in with $348,258 and significant contributions from the Teddy’s Angels and Martin’s Devils ball teams and from the Lumby Lions.

In the case of Salmon Arm’s spray park, the community initiated the process by fundraising for a new park.

“There was a group of residents and families who got the ball rolling,” said Case.

Shuert believes that could also be the case in Enderby.

“I am positive we could get many local businesses, groups and individuals on board to offer their services and time to get this project underway,” she said in her letter to the city, also offering her own time and services.