Flag raising at School District 83 centre recognizes Secwépemc territory

Neskonlith band councillor Cora Anthony looks on as Neskonlith councillor and knowledge keeper Louis Thomas raises the Secwepemculecw flag with help from Adams Lake councillor Gina Johnny on Friday, April 30, 2021 at the School District 83 District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)Neskonlith band councillor Cora Anthony looks on as Neskonlith councillor and knowledge keeper Louis Thomas raises the Secwepemculecw flag with help from Adams Lake councillor Gina Johnny on Friday, April 30, 2021 at the School District 83 District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)
District 83 Principal of Indigenous Education Anne Tenning welcomes speakers to the Secwepemculecw flag-raising ceremony at the District Education Support Centre on Friday, April 30, 2021. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)District 83 Principal of Indigenous Education Anne Tenning welcomes speakers to the Secwepemculecw flag-raising ceremony at the District Education Support Centre on Friday, April 30, 2021. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)
Neskonlith band councillor Cora Anthony speaks during the Secwepemculecw flag-raising ceremony held at the District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm on April 30, 2021. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)The sun came out as the Secwepemculecw flag was raised at the District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm on Friday, April 30, 2021. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)Neskonlith band councillor Cora Anthony speaks during the Secwepemculecw flag-raising ceremony held at the District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm on April 30, 2021. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)The sun came out as the Secwepemculecw flag was raised at the District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm on Friday, April 30, 2021. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)
The sun came out as the Secwépemc flag was raised at the District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm on Friday, April 30, 2021. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)The sun came out as the Secwépemc flag was raised at the District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm on Friday, April 30, 2021. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)
Adams Lake councillor Gina Johnny speaks during the Secwepemculecw flag-raising ceremony held at the District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm on April 30, 2021. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)Adams Lake councillor Gina Johnny speaks during the Secwepemculecw flag-raising ceremony held at the District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm on April 30, 2021. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)
Marianne VanBuskirk, Salmon Arm trustee on the School District 83 board of education, speaks at the Secwepemculecw flag-raising ceremony held at the District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm on April 30, 2021. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)Marianne VanBuskirk, Salmon Arm trustee on the School District 83 board of education, speaks at the Secwepemculecw flag-raising ceremony held at the District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm on April 30, 2021. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)
Salmon Arm Metis Association representative Patti Berthot speaks at the Secwepemculecw flag-raising ceremony held at the District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm on April 30, 2021. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)Salmon Arm Metis Association representative Patti Berthot speaks at the Secwepemculecw flag-raising ceremony held at the District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm on April 30, 2021. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)
School District 83 Principal of Indigenous Education Anne Tenning, who led the ceremony which raised the Secwepemculecw flag at the District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm on April 30, 2021, introduces Lily Anthony of the Adams Lake band who presented the prayer. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)School District 83 Principal of Indigenous Education Anne Tenning, who led the ceremony which raised the Secwepemculecw flag at the District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm on April 30, 2021, introduces Lily Anthony of the Adams Lake band who presented the prayer. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)
Peter Jory, School District 83 superintendent, speaks at the Secwepemculecw flag-raising ceremony held at the District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm on April 30, 2021. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)Peter Jory, School District 83 superintendent, speaks at the Secwepemculecw flag-raising ceremony held at the District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm on April 30, 2021. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)
Darrell Jones, education director with the Splatsin band, speaks during the Secwepemculecw flag-raising ceremony held at the District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm on April 30, 2021. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)Darrell Jones, education director with the Splatsin band, speaks during the Secwepemculecw flag-raising ceremony held at the District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm on April 30, 2021. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)

“Raising the Secwepemculecw flag symbolizes School District 83’s recognition that our district is on the unceded and ancestral territories of the Secwépemc people.”

These words from Anne Tenning, School District 83 Principal of Indigenous Education, summed up the significance of the ceremony that took place on Friday, April 30 at the District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm.

COVID-19 protocols meant that Tenning emceed a small gathering of representatives and witnesses who came in person for the flag-raising, but many more were watching online.

Beginning the ceremony was a welcome to the territory from Neskonlith councillor and knowledge keeper Louis Thomas, who spoke in the language of his ancestors. Lily Anthony from the Adams Lake band offered a prayer.

Neskonlith councillor Cora Anthony said she was honoured to attend and described the occasion as a dream of hers and many other people.

“A lot of our kids will come to school and see that flag and just hold their head up and be proud of who they are,” she said.

Anthony noted that her fellow councillor Louis Thomas uses a Secwépemc word to describe all of B.C. as unceded territory. She said people should realize that, and that everyone needs to work together, with the government, and pass on the education to the children so they will be able to work hand-in-hand, “like we should have been doing for a good many years. This is just an historic moment, not only for me but for all our people.”

Adams Lake councillor Gina Johnny, who grew up and graduated from school in Salmon Arm and works in the school district, recognized the work of the Indigenous departments which have been supported by the bands over the years, all the students who have worked to graduate, and the support workers who do so much around culture and education.

Darrell Jones, Splatsin director of education, recalled how when he first started working in education, the school district did not acknowledge the Secwepemc territory. Now, so much has changed, he said, thanking the school district and the bands for all their work.

Read more: Raising of Secwepemculecw flag at Salmon Arm campus recognizes history

Read more: Flying Métis flag this year unfurls concerns within Salmon Arm council

Read more: Flag honours relationship

Representatives from the Little Shuswap Lake Band, Joan Arnouse and Bev Tomma, attended virtually.

Patti Berthot with the Salmon Arm Metis Association expressed appreciation for the Metis being accepted within the community and looking forward to building a strong education for students. She expressed thanks for the opportunity to honour the Secwepemc flag and territory.

School district trustee Marianne VanBuskirk pointed out that the flag was designed by a former District 83 student Travis Marr, who graduated in 1988 and is a cousin to Ranchero teacher Shannon Seed.

She said the flag-raising was a big step in building a relationship between the school district and the Secwepemc people, “especially knowing that every school in School District 83 will be proudly displaying the Secwepemc flag.”

Superintendent Peter Jory spoke about history and how the Indigenous Education department has, over the years, with the guidance of the district’s First Nations Education council, achieved many successes.

He said the graduation rate of Indigenous students was last year within the top 10 in school districts across the province, not far from the rate for non-Indigenous students. And, he acknowledged, there is still work to do to create a school district that is equitable for all.

As Neskonlith composer Tara Willard sang and Louis Thomas raised the flag, the sun shone its way through the clouds to mark the occasion.


marthawickett@saobserver.net
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