High court won’t hear case about decision to euthanize B.C. bear cub

The cub was discovered in 2016 and taken to a rehabilitation centre

The Supreme Court of Canada will not hear a case about the authority of conservation officers to euthanize wildlife following the controversial death of an orphaned bear cub.

The high court refused Thursday to consider an appeal of a ruling that British Columbia conservation officers have discretion when destroying wild animals.

READ MORE: B.C. cat’s leg amputated after being shot with pellet gun

Tiana Jackson discovered the black bear cub in 2016 and called a rehabilitation centre in Smithers, B.C., that was willing to accept the animal.

An officer from the provincial Conservation Officer Service examined the cub, decided it could not be rehabilitated and euthanized the animal.

The Association for the Protection of Fur-Bearing Animals filed a complaint against the service on behalf of Jackson, arguing officers can kill wild animals only when they are likely to harm people, property, wildlife or habitat.

Senior officials of the conservation service dismissed the complaint and the B.C. courts turned down subsequent appeals, prompting the association to take its case to the Supreme Court.

The Canadian Press

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