Idling comes under scrutiny

Coldstream council instructed staff Monday to prepare an anti-idling bylaw for consideration.

It may eventually be illegal to let your vehicle just sit and pump exhaust into the atmosphere.

Coldstream council instructed staff Monday to prepare an anti-idling bylaw for consideration.

“We don’t have a tool in the tool box to deal with problems when they arise,” said Coun. Richard Enns, adding that there is an issue in areas like Lavington Elementary.

Enns called on his colleagues to take action while council was considering a recommendation not to consider anti-idling rules until the former regional district air quality committee is possibly re-established.

“We are in a community where we should answer the issue independently of what the regional district does,” said Enns.

Opposition to Enns’ motion came from Councillors Peter McClean and Glen Taylor.

“I’m cautious with staff going out and enforcing bylaws,” said Taylor, who believes idling has a limited footprint.

“The only places it (bylaw) will impact is the schools where people are picking up their kids and the Lavington industrial zone where vehicles are running.”

In a related matter, the municipality will pursue  air quality monitoring during a meeting with B.C.’s environment minister at the Union of B.C. Municipalities convention in Vancouver in September.

“It’s appropriate to move the issue of testing along. It’s fallen by the wayside,” said Enns.

Some residents of Lavington have been pushing for air quality monitoring because of a pellet plant currently under construction.

Originally, the municipality was only going to speak to the environment minister about water sampling.

“If we’re going to meet with them about Coldstream Creek, they will be in the room,” said Coun. Pat Cochrane of pursuing air quality monitoring.