Lumpy is being challenged over processes related to new businesses.

Lumpy is being challenged over processes related to new businesses.

Lumby politician questions process

Coun. Nick Hodge has asked for a report from staff about how many business licenses are approved

A  Lumby politician believes village bureaucracy may be preventing new business.

Coun. Nick Hodge has asked for a report from staff about how many business licenses are approved and how many are denied.

“Council needs to know if bylaws are blocking business from coming to Lumby,” he said.

However, the rest of council denied Hodge’s request for a staff report.

Mayor Kevin Acton says such a move would  have led to council micro-managing.

“We set the rules and it’s up to staff to enforce them,” he said, adding that he doesn’t believe there is a problem.

“Bylaws ensure businesses in town are appropriate.”

The issue arose after Hodge’s application to operate a bed and breakfast in his home was turned down by the village because of inadequate zoning.

The village has initiated a process to change residential zoning to allow for B&Bs.

Besides his own, Hodge says he is aware of two other business license applications denied.

Road name identified

A lane in Lumby will soon have a name.

Council has agreed to name an existing road after the Inglis family.

“It meets our naming policy and it’s a historic name,” said Mayor Kevin Acton.

The lane is at the east end of Dyffryn Road near the industrial park.

The request for a name came from a resident of the lane.

“Our addresses do not exist on GPS because Dyffryn Road ends at the end of the pavement. As you can imagine, this causes confusion with deliveries, ambulance and anyone trying to find us,” said Sandra Quibell in a letter.

“When the land was originally purchased, I believe that our access was to be named Inglis lane or drive.”