Vernon's Upper Room Mission has had to restrict activities after a provincial gaming grant was cut.

Vernon's Upper Room Mission has had to restrict activities after a provincial gaming grant was cut.

MLA continues to lobby for mission

A $100,000 gaming grant was cut from the Upper Room Mission.

Efforts continue to throw a financial lifeline to a Vernon non-profit agency.

Eric Foster, Vernon-Monashee MLA, says he is still meeting with the Ministry of Community Development after a $100,000 gaming grant was cut from the Upper Room Mission.

“We’re having a good look at the whole practice,” he said of grant distributions.

“We’re not getting the results we want and we’re looking at how the whole thing is rolled out.”

The loss of the $100,000 has forced the URM to close its doors between meals because of insufficient staff resources. That means clients cannot stay there for a coffee or to visit. That has led to some concerns about loitering and other activities downtown.

“They provide a valuable service and we need to make it work for them,” said Foster of government programs.

Foster has discussed the matter with URM administration.

“I don’t know what we will be able to do but I’ve encouraged them to appeal the (ministry) decision,” said Foster.

“We can help them tweak their application. Hopefully we can come up with something for them.”

Beyond reapplying for the grant, URM is also considering other funding options.

“I’m incredibly optimistic we will come to a solution as good if not better than when there were gaming grants,” said Rick Lavin, executive director.

Lavin has also discussed the issue with the City of Vernon and the need for a day shelter.