View of Osoyoos Lake looking north from Oroville, WA. Photo courtesy Neil Bousquet/Osoyoos Lake Water Quality Society)

View of Osoyoos Lake looking north from Oroville, WA. Photo courtesy Neil Bousquet/Osoyoos Lake Water Quality Society)

Osoyoos growing faster than the regional district

By 2025, an additional 137 residential units are needed to keep up with population growth

The town of Osoyoos just completed their housing needs report, and the town is growing quickly.

Since 2006, the town has grown faster than the Regional District of Okanagan Similkameen has, with a growth rate of six per cent compared to four.

The town currently has a population of 5,085 according to the last census information from 2016, and is expected to see that grow by another nine per cent, or 430 people from 2020 to 2025.

Out of the 3,151 private residences in the community, 21 per cent are not occupied year-round according to the 2016 census, leading to 676 homes sitting vacant. That number is more than double the 10 per cent of homes or 236 homes that sat vacant or were inhabited only temporarily in 2006.

According to the report, there were 2,515 households in the community in 2016, growing by 43 each year on average since 2011. By 2025, the report estimates there will be 2,780 households in the community.

READ MORE: Affordable housing projects in Keremeos continue to sit empty

Since 2009, the average house sale price has increased by an average of 49 per cent, and 21 per cent of Osoyoos households spend 30 per cent or more of their before-tax income on shelter costs. The monthly median rent in Osoyoos ranges from $1,000 for a one-bedroom to $1,325 for a three-bedroom residential unit, with a median rent of $1,000 considered affordable for a household with an annual income of $40,000.

The average income in Osoyoos did not see the same growth compared to housing sales, going from $51,700 in 2006 to $53,770 in 2011 to $53,644 in 2016. Half of the population earns from $40,000 to $99,000 annually, with 36 per cent earning less than $40,000.

(Town of Osoyoos)

From 2006 to 2016, the amount of Osoyoos residents who fall under the Core Housing Needs has risen from five per cent to nine, with renters two to three times more likely fall under Core Housing or Extreme Housing Need. Core Housing Need is defined by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation as a household whose housing does not meet the minimum requirements of at least one of adequacy, affordability or suitability, and paying more 30 per cent of income for rent that provide them a more suitable home.

READ MORE: New Oasis of long-term housing in Keremeos

During the peak season for tourism in July 2019, there were a total of 191 units listed on the Airbnb website for Osoyoos.

In Osoyoos there are 157 units subsidized by BC Housing in 2019, 76 of which serve low-income seniors, and the remaining 81 units serving families and other groups.

There are no cooperative housing units or emergency shelters in Osoyoos.

From 2020 to 2025, the estimate is the community will need 137 additional residential units to keep up with population growth, with 82 two-bedroom, 33 one-bedroom and 21 three-or-more bedroom units needed.

That growth is expected to be highest in people 65 and older in the community, which already makes up the largest percentage of the of the population in the town with 43 per cent, while those aged 0 to 54 make up 38 per cent.

In the RDOS as a whole, the 65 and above population makes up 31 per cent, with 0 to 54 making up 50 per cent.

To report a typo, email: editor@pentictonwesternnews.com.


@PentictonNews
newstips@pentictonwesternnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Housing

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

The goal of the group is to help women owned businesses recover from the pandemic and to assist women to become angel investors and women owned or co-owned businesses to better access capital.
Okanagan women’s investor fund launched to aid women-owned businesses

Twenty-five women have formed a new Okanagan angel investment fund

City of Armstrong council will discuss a proposed Consumer Price Index increase of 0.84% to their monthly stipends at its regular meeting Monday, March 8. (Morning Star - file photo)
Armstrong council to discuss small pay raise

Staff recommending 0.84% Consumer Price Index hike to monthly stipends

Head chef Travis Ashley dumps the first load of lobsters into the vats of boiling saltwater. (Jim Taylor - Contributed)
150 lobsters served in Lake Country drive-thru fundraiser

Rotary Club sees success in unique COVID-friendly lobster dinner event

Morning Star columnist Sam McNair puts the business spotlight on Expressions of Time in his latest article. (Sam McNair - Contributed)
Small Business Spotlight: Vernon bookstore specializes in more than literature

Expressions of Time is a beloved asset to the local business community

Fire truck.
Scooter struck in downtown Vernon

Traffic may be affected around 30th Avenue

Five Kelowna writers are featured in an anthology that launched in time for International Women's Day. (Twila Amato - Black Press Media)
International Women’s Day: Book exploring fears features Kelowna writers

The book has launched in time for International Women’s Day

(Black Press Media files)
Hosts charged, attendees facing COVID fines after Vancouver police bust party at condo

Police had previously received 10 complains about that condo

It's tick season in South Okanagan.
Tick season has started in South Okanagan

A Penticton adventure company collected 200 ticks last year to be studied for Lyme Disease

Minister of Families, Children and Social Development Ahmed Hussen takes part in an update on the COVID pandemic during a press conference in Ottawa on Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2020. A joint federal and B.C. government housing program announced today aims to help people living in up to 25,000 vulnerable households pay their rent. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Federal, B.C. governments announce $517-million rent aid program to help vulnerable

Benefits for those not eligible for B.C.’s Rental Assistance Program or Shelter Aid for Elderly Renters

(BC SPCA)
Is it safe to give your dog some peanut butter? Not always, BC SPCA warns

Some commercial peanut butter ingredients can be harmful to dogs

Phase four of the Kicking Horse Canyon project would twin the winding stretch of the Trans-Canada Highway just east of Golden. ~ Photo by B.C. Ministry of Transportation
Additional closures announced to Trans-Canada east of Golden

Additional closures will be needed in May as a part of Phase 4 of the Kicking Horse Canyon Project

Dawn Low first moved “upstairs” to the administrative department of the City of Revelstoke in 2009. (Jocelyn Doll - Revelstoke Review)
120 years later, first female CAO appointed in Revelstoke

International Women’s Day was first celebrated on March 19, 1911, in Austria,… Continue reading

(Black Press Media file photo)
COSAR called to rescue missing skier near Big White

Fortunately, the skier found his way out of the area

Granfondo is going ahead in Penticton this September. (Western file photo)
Granfondo is a go in Penticton

Axel Merckx pushed the event to September in hopes of a ‘full Fondo experience’

Most Read