Premier’s chief of staff hands in resignation

Ken Boessenkool, Premier Christy Clark’s chief of staff, has resigned after eight months in the premier’s office

Ken Boessenkool, Premier Christy Clark’s chief of staff, has resigned after eight months in the premier’s office.

“Earlier this month I was involved in an incident where I acted inappropriately,” Boessenkool said in a resignation letter released by the premier’s office Monday morning. “I was wrong, regretted my behaviour very much and immediately and unconditionally apologized.

“Notwithstanding my genuine apology and sense of regret, and following my meeting with you earlier today, I tender my letter of resignation as your chief of staff effective immediately.”

Clark has appointed Dan Doyle, chairman of the BC Hydro board of directors, to serve as acting chief of staff.

Clark told reporters in Vancouver she can’t comment on the circumstances that led to Boessenkool’s departure, because of privacy laws that apply to all employers.

She said she heard about an incident two weeks ago and after it was investigated, she asked for his resignation. There has been no suggestion of any criminal conduct, Clark said.

In his letter, Boessenkool said: “This will give me a chance to return to Calgary to be with my family – who I have also let down – and from whom I have been separated on a weekly basis for most of the last eight months.”

Boessenkool was hired by the premier’s office in January after serving as a senior adviser to Prime Minister Stephen Harper. He replaced Mike McDonald, who moved to a senior staff role with the B.C. Liberal Party.

In recent years Boessenkool has worked for consulting firms Hill and Knowlton Canada and GCI Group Canada. The federal lobbyist registry shows a long list of former clients, including pipeline company Enbridge Inc., oil sands producer Suncor Energy Inc., mining giant Rio Tinto, the Bank of Nova Scotia and TASER International Inc.

Boessenkool also formed a group called the Alberta Blue Committee, devoted to maintaining a united right in a province where the upstart Wildrose Alliance Party has challenged the Progressive Conservative dynasty.