Mayor Wayne Lippert joins in the dance warmup to kick off the CIBC Run for the Cure Sunday at Clarence Fulton Secondary.

Mayor Wayne Lippert joins in the dance warmup to kick off the CIBC Run for the Cure Sunday at Clarence Fulton Secondary.

Run strives for cancer cure

Rain clouds didn’t dampen dreams of a world without breast cancer.

Rain clouds didn’t dampen dreams of a world without breast cancer.

More than 600 people participated in the 20th annual CIBC Run for the Cure at Clarence Fulton Secondary School Sunday.

“It’s great when you see friends and family come together dressed in pink. There were lots of smiles,” said Lindsay Smith, run director with Rae Jensen.

The event, which featured a five or one-kilometre walk or run, raised $65,965 for initiatives in breast cancer prevention, early detection, treatment and research.

“With the economic times, we knew it would be less than last year ($100,000 in 2010),” said Smith of the financial results.

“But with the Wine Women and Woods golf tournament raising $80,000 and us raising $65,965, a lot has been raised for the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation in the community.”

During the Run for the Cure, a number of awards were presented.

Tara Limb received the determination award as the individual who collected the most donations ($4,700).

“She does that every year,” said Smith.

Timmy’s Team got the CIBC corporate spirit team challenge award for the most donations raised by a corporate group.

The women’s team challenge award for the team of women who raised the most money went to Pink Ladies.

Bustin’ for Denise received the friends and family team challenge award presented by East Side Mario’s.

Vernon was one of eight Run for the  Cure sites  in B.C. and $3.67 million was raised provincially. Across Canada, more than $30 million was collected in 59 communities.

Smith believes the local Run for the Cure drew so many participants because breast cancer has touched the lives of numerous people.

“It can be everyone’s mom, daughter, aunt or neighbour,” she said.

“It’s a very common disease and that’s what brings people together.”