The Salmon River continued to rise and flow faster on Saturday, May 23 following rainfall in the previous days. (Jim Elliot/ Salmon Arm Observer)

The Salmon River continued to rise and flow faster on Saturday, May 23 following rainfall in the previous days. (Jim Elliot/ Salmon Arm Observer)

Salmon River sees two days of increasing flow following rainy week

The River Forecast Centre has a streamflow advisory in effect for the area

Following recent rainfall both the level and discharge volume of the Salmon River has increased sharply, rising approximately 20 centimetres in two days.

According to the provincial government’s River Forecast Centre, the Salmon River measured near Salmon Arm has increased from 44 cubic metres per second to 54 cubic metres per second since midnight on May 22. The water level has also sharply increased over the same time period, rising from 2.48 to 2.68 metres. The sharp rise followed a relatively steady period in terms of both river depth and volume between May 19 and 22.

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The Salmon River is one of four rivers in the southern interior that is the subject of a high streamflow advisory which was issued on May 19. The Nicola River both above Nicola Lake and downstream through Spences Bridge is affected as are tributaries of the North Thompson River around Clearwater and Barriere and various tributaries in the North Okangan near Vernon Lumby and Winfield. High streamflow advisories signify that no major flooding is expected but river levels are rising rapidly; Minor flooding in low lying areas in possible.

According to the stream flow advisory, river levels are expected to remain elevated this week and snow melt is still contributing to river levels. If precipitation remains lighter through the region as is forecast, the river level should stabilize and recede.

The public is advised to stay clear of the fast-flowing rivers and potentially unstable riverbanks during the high-streamflow period.



jim.elliot@saobserver.net

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Water