Fires in the Lower Similkameen on July 23, 2018. (Screengrab B.C. Wildfire Service)

Snowy Mountain fire grows to 1,360 hectares in size

A high elevation fire south of Keremeos in the Snowy Protected Area has more than tripled in size

The Snowy Mountain fire, south of Keremeos, has grown to 1,360 hectares in size.

The fire was first discovered after a lightning storm came through the area July 17. Since being discovered the fire’s name has changed from Snowy Mountain to Scully Mountain fire and is now listed as Snowy Mountain again. B.C. Wildfire told the Review late last week that the fire was actually a cluster of fires and was difficult to map.

As of Monday morning B.C. Wildfire Service was not actioning the fire as it is in a remote and inaccessible location.

Related: UPDATE: Size of Scully Mountain unknown

A remote camera is being mounted to provide information about the growth of the fire.

It is currently listed as zero per cent contained, but is being closely monitored, B.C. Wildfire Service states.

“There is no change to the size of this fire. It is burning at a high elevation and is visible to surrounding communities.”

The fire is located in the Snowy Protected Area. While further assessment is carried out, B.C. Parks has closed the Ewart and Wall Creek Trail until further notice.

Another fire of note in the Lower Similkameen is the Placer Mountain fire, between Cathedral Lake and Eastgate.

As of Monday morning the fire is 320 hectares in size and is listed at zero per cent contained. This fire was also discovered after lightning came through the area on July 17.

Related: Update: Placer Mountain fire continues to grow

A B.C. Wildfire crew of 22 firefighters, four helicopters, eight pieces of heavy equipment and industry personnel will action the fire and any spot fires that may flare up on Monday.

B.C. Wildfire crews are working to construct fire guard with heavy equipment on the fire’s north flank and will assess east and south flanks to establish machine guard.

The other two fires that continue to burn in the Lower Similkameen near Keremeos are relatively small.

The North Side of the South Slopes fire is at about two hectares in size.

The Ashnola River Road fire is currently listed at 0.6 hectares in size.

Related: Okanagan Wildfires: Monday morning update on wildfires and evacuations

Continue to check back for more updates throughout the day.

 

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