Spall fire ban policy sparked

Camp fire regulations policy drafted, speed boards pursued in township

A camp fire regulations policy has officially been drafted in Spallumcheen.

The policy is designed to help township administration.

“Specifically, it provides direction as to when a camp fire ban is to be implemented within the township boundaries,” wrote deputy corporate officer Cindy Graves in a report to council.

The policy will also establish an advertising budget to ensure the public is informed about camp fire bans.

The bans will be implemented after confirmation from the Armstrong Spallumcheen fire chief or his designate that a fire ban is warranted, and after confirmation from the ministry of forests’ wildfire management branch that a ban has been imposed in the Kamloops Fire District.

The township is in the Kamloops Fire District.

Council unanimously approved the policy draft.

Speed boards pursued

The township is considering joining forces with a pair of communities to purchase speed reader boards to help deal with speeding motorists.

“I’ve had e-mails from other administrators and there is some interest in getting speed reader boards if we can agree on cost sharing and how to use it,” said Spallumcheen chief administrative officer Greg Betts.

Lumby and Enderby have expressed interest in the boards which show motorists how fast they’re travelling.

The township has had many complaints about speeders, especially along Otter Lake Cross Road.

The City of Vernon RCMP Safe Communities Unit’s rural program manager has approached Spallumcheen council in the past with different types of boards or other technology aimed at reducing speeders.

Council was shown four varieties that ranged in price from $3,000 to $12,000.

“The boards are an effective tool, and it certainly proves we’re trying to do everything within our power on a number of these complaints,” said Coun. Todd York.

 

Council unanimously agreed to have Betts pursue speed reader board costs and a potential sharing program with the other communities.