Tsútswecw Provincial Park interpretive centre was damaged by trees downed in a recent snowstorm. (Jim Cooperman photo)

Storm damage in Shuswap, trees fall on cabin

Provincial park where thousands come to view sockeye salmon run temporarily off limits

Recent storms have taken their toll in the Shuswap, one casualty being the cabin at Tsútswecw Provincial Park.

Two trees came down just after the new year began, landing on the interpretive centre in the North Shuswap park.

The park itself, which normally stays open year round, closed until further notice on Jan. 6. It is where hundreds of thousands of visitors have come to see sockeye salmon make their miraculous return from the Pacific Ocean to their spawning grounds on the Adams River.

“As a result of winter storm damage at Tsútswecw Provincial Park, the gates have been closed to prevent public access,” states the BC Parks website. “Significant trees and facilities have been impacted throughout the park. Precautions are being taken to protect the public, until assessments and recovery efforts can be completed.”

While BC Parks provides the Adams River Salmon Society with a permit to put on events in the park, the log cabin is owned by the salmon society. It usually closes after Thanksgiving and reopens in the spring.

Read more: Story trail at Tsútswecw Provincial Park opens June 7

Read more: Shuswap salmon subject of symposium

Read more: Paying tribute to a primeval passage

Society president David Askew said the cabin provides an important part of the society’s programming and he hopes the roof can be repaired. He estimates the building is at least 10 to 15 years old.

“Part of the roof is broken where it overhangs,” he said. “It doesn’t look like the tree went through the roof in the centre, but it’s going to be tricky getting it off there.”

He said the damage hasn’t been properly assessed yet, so it’s not known how the repairs will be tackled.

Askew points out that the park is normally used year round. At Thanksgiving, a couple of thousand people came to see chinook salmon spawning, he says.

“It’s a great park and very popular and well used.”



marthawickett@saobserver.net

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