DOWNED TREES Stumps remain where trees once stood at the edge of the Woodbridge Nature Preserve in Summerland. The municipality is now considering potential avenues of recourse and ways to mitigate the environmental impact from the removal of these trees. (Summerland Review file photo)

Summerland council, staff pursue recourse after unauthorized tree removal

Trees were cut down at edge of Woodbridge Nature Preserve in Summerland

After trees were removed from a nature preserve without authorization, municipal staff will pursue avenues of recourse and will meet with a business to mitigate the environmental impact from this incident.

In August, trees were removed from the edge of the Woodbridge Nature Preserve in Trout Creek, near the site where a new home is under construction.

The preserve, off Nixon Road, was officially dedicated in December, 2017. The site is marked with a sign and a fence along a portion of the preserve.

It was set up as a habitat for Lewis’s woodpecker and the screech owl.

The population of the woodpecker is declining with fewer than 1,000 birds remaining in Canada. These birds nest in old cottonwood trees. When these trees rot from the inside, they provide a shelter for the woodpeckers. Screech owls also prefer the same habitat.

Members of the Woodbridge family, who donated the land for the preserve, were devastated by the unauthorized removal of the trees.

“I don’t want things like this to happen anymore,” Kolyn Woodbridge said during a special meeting of council on Sept. 6.

At that meeting, Dennis Apchin of Apchin Design Corporation apologized to the Woodbridge family for the tree removal.

He said the trees were removed because of safety concerns, but he would be willing to replant the trees to take other measures to make restitution.

“It was because of the trees that my client bought the property,” he said. “We were trying to follow protocol.”

At the meeting, others said there is confusion about tree removal policies in Summerland.

“Obviously, it’s not clear what the protocols are in our town,” said Sharon Mansiere.

Members of council and municipal staff also believe a proper policy is needed.

“We need a written policy,” said Coun. Janet Peake. “That has been a lack on our part.”

Coun. Richard Barkwill said tree protection in Summerland is relatively new and a s a result, information is needed.

Linda Tynan, chief administrative officer for the municipality, said the tree removal had not been authorized.

“The developers did not have permission from the district,” she said.

To report a typo, email:
news@summerlandreview.com
.



news@summerlandreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Letter: Resource sector hangs in the balance

Suits and Boots looks to give resource towns a voice

Okanagan Valley Big Band swings into Vernon

Jazz Club show Saturday, Jan. 26

Vernon’s Vasek Pospisil out after back surgery

Vernon tennis star succumbs to nagging herniated disc; undergoes successful surgery

Vernon Wellness Centre celebrates 10 years, donates to hospital

Portion of proceeds Jan. 24 going to Vernon Jubilee Hospital’s Women and Children’s Health Services

UPDATE: B.C. legislature managers accused of excessive travel, personal expense claims

Clerk Craig James, security chief Gary Lenz call allegations ‘completely false’

B.C. man fined $10,000 after leaving moose to suffer before death

Surrey man was convicted last week on three Wildlife Act charges

Man charged in 7-Eleven fire in Shuswap granted bail

Accused facing arson charges released with 23 conditions including a 7 p.m. curfew

‘Blue Monday’ isn’t real, but depression can be

CMHA encourages people to prioritize their mental health

Parole granted for drunk driver who killed B.C. RCMP officer

Kenneth Jacob Fenton will be able to attend alcohol abuse treatment, nearly three years after crash that killed Const. Sarah Beckett

Anti-pipeline group wants NEB to consider impact of emissions, climate change

Stand.earth filed NEB motion asking to apply same standard to the project as it did with Energy East pipeline

B.C. man charged in 2014 snake venom death of toddler

Henry Thomas was taking care of the North Vancouver girl the day before she died

B.C.’s largest public-sector union wants inquiry into money laundering, drugs

Union officials say Premier John Horgan and Attorney General David Eby have not ruled out the possibility of a public inquiry

Teen in confrontation with Native American: I didn’t provoke

Nick Sandmann of Covington Catholic High School said he was trying to defuse the situation

Most Read