United Way falls short of goal

Community groups will still get an infusion of cash despite a fundraiser coming up short.

Community groups will still get an infusion of cash despite a fundraiser coming up short.

The United Way is starting to receive grant applications from about 28 non-profit agencies for 2011.

“Some groups are looking for less and some are seeking more,” said Linda Yule, executive director.

United Way faces a challenge because it only raised $229,000 or 76 per cent of its $300,000 campaign goal.

Yule believes there are a number of reasons for the fundraiser target not being achieved.

“Economic conditions are a factor,” she said.

“Some people have been laid off and some companies have downsized.”

Employee payroll deductions were up during the campaign but corporate and individual donations were down.

Yule says there may also be a lack of public awareness about what United Way does.

“We can’t point to a piece of equipment or a food hamper. We’re talking about community programs.”

Groups that have received support before include Abbeyfield House, the Enderby Family Resource Centre, the Falkland First Responders, the North Okanagan Family Resource Centre, the First Nations Friendship Centre, Kindale and the White Valley Community Resource Centre.

According to Yule, it’s critical for the public to stand behind non-profits that provide necessary programs.

“A lot of our agencies have had difficulty accessing government funds and yet there is more demand for services,” she said.