EDITORIAL: A national embarrassment

Alberta’s ban on the sale of B.C. wines in that province heightens tensions and creates animosity

Although Alberta’s ban on the sale of B.C. wines in that province is over, the dispute between the two provinces remains a national embarrassment.

Because of British Columbia’s position on the Kinder Morgan pipeline, Alberta premier Rachel Notley stopped the import of all B.C. wines into Alberta.

The B.C. government has said it would restrict increased shipments of bitumen while it continues to study the effectiveness of spill response and cleanup.

The wine embargo was lifted last Thursday, but it should not have been imposed in the first place.

Whatever anyone thinks of the B.C. government’s position on the pipeline, stopping the movement of B.C. wines into Alberta did not address the issue. Instead, it served to heighten tensions and create a spirit of animosity between the two provinces.

And it has set a dangerous precedent for provincial governments.

If Alberta was able to stop the movement of B.C. wines because of a trade dispute, would it be possible for British Columbia to halt the import of Alberta beef? Could another interprovincial dispute result in a province banning the sale of Quebec maple syrup or automobiles manufactured in Ontario?

Such questions may appear ridiculous, but if one provincial government can impose an embargo, what is to prevent others from similar actions?

Interprovincial sanctions benefit nobody. They only serve to weaken trade ties between provinces and weaken the Canadian economy.

Producers lose income, consumers lose the choices they once enjoyed and governments imposing such measures appear petty and childish.

Whatever differences exist between provinces, these need to be handled through proper legal and governmental channels. Otherwise, Canada’s reputation on the world stage will be that of a country riddled with internal strife.

If this country is to have a strong role internationally, there is no room for petty moves such as interprovincial trade embargoes.

Just Posted

Vancouver artist rocks to fight opioid crisis

Jeremy Allingham is set to bring his guitar-focused rock ‘n roll to Kelowna April 6, Vernon June 9

Okanagan Falls winery showing international photo project

Liquidity Wines will be sole Canadian show of National Geographic’s Photo Ark

Local legion saved

Vernon legion will remain open thanks to new board

Vipers lose Stapley, Williamson

Vipers lead quarterfinal series 2-1

Tracing their family tree

Sisters searching for Summerland connection

Crook’s Corner

Arts and entertainment highlights this week across the Okanagan

How to keep local news visible in your Facebook feed

Facebook has changed the news feed to emphasize personal connections. You might see less news.

B.C. Scientists witness first-ever documented killer whale infanticide

“It’s horrifying and fascinating at the same time.”

Lawyer for one suspect in beating of man with autism says he’s not guilty

Ronjot Singh Dhami will turn himself in, lawyer said

Liberals awarded $100,000 contract to man at centre of Facebook data controversy

Christopher Wylie says his voter-profiling company collected private information from 50 million Facebook users

Kelowna celebrates World Down Syndrome Day

More than 50 people gathered in Kelowna to bring awareness to diversity and difference

Facebook’s Zuckerberg admits mistakes in privacy scandal

Zuckerberg admits to privacy scandal involving a Trump-connected data-mining firm, but no apology

UPDATE: Former B.C. city councillor sentenced nine months for sexual assault

Dave Murray, convicted this past fall, hired a private investigator to intrude on the victim’s life.

Shots fired in Kamloops

Kamloops RCMP are investigating a report of shots fired and a possible explosion at a trailer court

Most Read