EDITORIAL: Election creates new dynamics

Cnce the campaign signs are down and the photo-ops are over, what is the future awaiting the parties and Canadians?

It was certainly a historic night in Canada.

The third-place Liberals swept to a majority during Monday’s federal election while the Conservatives were tossed after a decade in power and the NDP’s hold on official opposition status collapsed.

Scholars and pundits will now take weeks, if not years, to analyze the results and what exactly led to such a political shift.

However, while that happens, reality is starting to set in.

Justin Trudeau and the Liberals made a number of promises during the campaign, including pumping money into infrastructure and keeping deficit spending to just three years. Now that Trudeau can scrutinize the financial books, will those promises be upheld or will they have to evolve, risking upset among voters?

Not surprisingly, Stephen Harper announced his resignation as Conservative leader after the party was sent a clear message that its policies were not embraced by many Canadians. What this means is that the party, which is now the official opposition, will go through a leadership race. Will that infuse new energy in the party or will it lead to behind-the-scenes backstabbing and finger-pointing for the electoral loss?

Of course the other story of the night was the NDP shrinking from 95 seats to 44. The orange wave orchestrated by the lake Jack Layton in 2011 could not be maintained by Tom Mulcair. Mulcair insists he’s sticking around as leader, but the membership may decide otherwise.

Obviously there is a sense of optimism among many Canadians after Monday’s election, and the call for real change provides promise.

However, once the campaign signs are down and the photo-ops are over, what is the future awaiting the parties and Canadians?