EDITORIAL: Enderby food bank requires support

Obviously changes at the Enderby Food Bank are going to generate concerns among residents, and particularly those who rely on the service

Obviously changes at the Enderby Food Bank are going to generate concerns among residents, and particularly those who rely on the service.

After all, the ability of the agency to operate faces challenges now that the Vernon-based Salvation Army is withdrawing its administrative and operational support, including providing food to stock the shelves.

And it would be easy to point fingers at the Salvation Army but the reality is it’s been coping with significant financial difficulties and tough decisions have had to be made to ensure the long-term viability of its Vernon base.

That means that a made-in- Enderby solution needs to be found if the food bank is to remain an active player in food security. And there’s no question that this can be done based on the community’s track record of pulling together.

“We need to keep something in place and we will because that’s the kind of community we are,” said Mayor Greg McCune.

Already long-time food bank volunteers, city officials and other non-profit agencies are meeting behind the scenes and considering options.

Coun. Raquel Knust is pleased with the tone of the discussions.

“We have a lot of stakeholders committed to filling this need but how it will look hasn’t been determined,” she said.

But the solution can’t be just left to community groups and elected officials.

The residents of Enderby and the surrounding rural area must realize that the food bank is critical. With 20 to 40 hampers handed out every month, it means their family, neighbours and co-workers directly benefit.

The time for action is now.