EDITORIAL: Keep Terry Fox’s legacy going

Sunday marks a 34-year-old tradition which has seen people across the country taking steps towards Terry Fox’s dream.

Sunday marks a 34-year-old tradition which has seen people across the country taking steps towards Terry Fox’s dream.

“Even if I don’t finish, we need others to continue,” said Fox, who started his Marathon of Hope in April 1980 but by September had stopped running as his cancer had spread to his lungs.

“It’s got to keep going without me.”

The strides Fox made, artificial leg and all, are an inspiration.

And his country has carried on his efforts to raise funds for cancer research.

Local residents can do their part by running, walking and/or making a donation today at Coldstream Park, where the five-kilometre run  starts at 9 a.m. (following registration at 8 a.m.).

His efforts are also aided and celebrated by millions of students and educators on the National School Run Day, Sept. 24.

But with the current labour dispute showing no end in sight, that may not take place in B.C.

It’s unfortunate considering the thousands of dollars young children raise for the cause by collecting pledges for their run. It will also mean many children  (particularly the younger ones) will not have the opportunity to learn about what Terry Fox did, since the schools have for decades done an exceptional job of incorporating him into lesson plans.

The good news is that students and teachers can still make a difference by participating in today’s event.

And hopefully the lessons about Fox will continue in the schools soon enough.

Fox died in June 1981, but his legacy must live on forever.